Responsible and Ethical Business Practices and Their Synergies with Health, Safety and Well-Being

  • Aditya Jain
  • Stavroula Leka
  • Gerard I. J. M. Zwetsloot
Chapter
Part of the Aligning Perspectives on Health, Safety and Well-Being book series (AHSW)

Abstract

The nature of the relationship between business responsibility, sustainability, and health, safety and well-being in the workplace varies widely among initiatives. Some initiatives refer explicitly to occupational health and safety issues, while others focus only on new social issues that have no tradition in companies, or on totally voluntary aspects (such as for example action against the use of unfair labour practices by suppliers in developing countries or employment of vulnerable workers). Health and safety at work is an essential component of an organizations’ responsibility and companies are increasingly recognizing that they cannot be responsible externally, while having poor ethical performance internally. The internal dimension of business responsibility and sustainability is now identified as a critical component of engagement to move the area of occupational health and safety forward. In this chapter, we will discuss the synergies between business responsibility, sustainability, and health, safety and well-being highlighting their link with organizational sustainability, strategic management and sustainable development.

Keywords

Responsible business conduct Corporate social responsibility Sustainability Health safety and well-being Business ethics 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Aditya Jain
    • 1
  • Stavroula Leka
    • 2
  • Gerard I. J. M. Zwetsloot
    • 3
    • 2
  1. 1.Nottingham University Business School and Centre for Organizational Health and DevelopmentUniversity of NottinghamNottinghamUK
  2. 2.Centre for Organizational Health and DevelopmentUniversity of NottinghamNottinghamUK
  3. 3.Gerard Zwetsloot Research & ConsultancyAmsterdamThe Netherlands

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