Advertisement

Community Forestry and Management of Forest Resources in Bhutan

  • Ramashray PrasadEmail author

Abstract

Community forestry is that part of forest management in which local rural people are involved in strengthening, spreading, managing, utilizing, and increasing the productivity of the forest under their custody, as well as protecting and preserving the reserved government forests by reducing human pressure. The concept of community forestry came because of the drastic reduction in forest cover near or in the vicinity of human reach and the deteriorating productivity of the forest. It is not only the loss of forest but also of other organisms found in the region; many of the species of forest flora and fauna are on the verge of extinction. The rainfall and climate are changing rapidly, and there is a large extent of deteriorating forest cover. The forests also play a greater role in reducing greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide by consumption through photosynthesis, apart from releasing oxygen. The vegetative cover is pumping out more and more moisture into the atmosphere to regulate the overall climate at a local level to the global scale. The forest is indispensable as it has multifaceted importance and cannot be further exploited without giving any second thought. When forests are to be utilized, such use must be done very judiciously and cautiously so that every proper care is taken. In another words, the forests should be managed sustainably. Almost all of Bhutan is mountainous by physical character with the very weak, fragile, susceptible, and shattered newly formed high Himalaya. The people are very much attached to the forests for their livelihood, and here it becomes even more important to manage the forest. Community forestry offers great hope and is growing very rapidly. Therefore, an attempt has been made to study community forestry in Bhutan in general, with particular emphasis on Eastern Bhutan.

Keywords

Carbon sink Community forestry Forest products Rural poverty Sustainable forest management 

References

  1. American Forests (1998) Regional ecosystem analysis Puget Sound Metropolitan Area, calculating the value of nature. http://www.americanforests.org/downloads/rea/AF_PugetSound.pdf. Last accessed 14 Dec 2010
  2. Barua I (2009) Conservation and management of community and natural resources: a case study from north east India. Stud Tribes Tribals 7(1):39–46Google Scholar
  3. Brendler T, Carey H (1998) Community forestry, defined. J For 96(3):21–23Google Scholar
  4. Census of Bhutan (2005) Population and housing census of Bhutan. Office of the Census Commissioner, Royal Government of Bhutan, ThimphuGoogle Scholar
  5. Chhetri BB (2009) Overview of community forestry in Bhutan. In: Proceedings of the national community forestry workshop 2009, Thimphu, 16–17 Apr, pp 24–32Google Scholar
  6. Chhetri BB, Schmidt K, Gilmour D (2009) Community forestry in Bhutan: exploring opportunities and facing challenges. Community forestry international workshop, Pokhara, Nepal, 15–18 Sept, pp 1–9Google Scholar
  7. Department of Forest and Park Services (2010) National strategy for community forestry: the way ahead. Ministry of Agriculture and Forest, Royal Government of Bhutan, ThimphuGoogle Scholar
  8. Dhital DB (2002) Overview of forest policy reviews in Bhutan. In: Proceedings of the forest policy workshop, Kuala Lumpur, 22–24 Jan, pp 22–23Google Scholar
  9. Gilmour D (2009) Lessons learned from community forestry in Asia: a strategic perspective. In: Proceedings of the national community forestry workshop 2009, Thimphu, 16–17 Apr, pp 11–15Google Scholar
  10. National Statistics Bureau (2003) Poverty analysis report. Royal Government of Bhutan, ThimphuGoogle Scholar
  11. Peljor N (2009) Community forestry in Bhutan: a policy perspective. In: Proceedings of a national workshop, community forestry in Bhutan: directions for the future, Thimphu, 16–17 Apr, pp 16–23Google Scholar
  12. Policy and Planning Division (PPD) (2008) Compendium of renewable natural resources statistics. Policy and Planning Division, Ministry of Agriculture, ThimphuGoogle Scholar
  13. Preston M, Frazier L, Hudson L, Morse S, Rice T (2006) Community forest management plan. City of Cambridge Island, pp 1–10Google Scholar
  14. Royal Government of Bhutan (RGoB) (2000) Forest and nature conservation rules of Bhutan. Department of Forest, Ministry of Agriculture, ThimphuGoogle Scholar
  15. Royal Government of Bhutan (RGoB) (2006) Forest and nature conservation rules of Bhutan. Department of Forest, Ministry of Agriculture, ThimphuGoogle Scholar
  16. Sharma R, Xu J, Sharma G (2007) Traditional agroforestry in the eastern Himalayan region: land management system supporting ecosystem services. Trop Ecol 48(2):189–200Google Scholar
  17. Temphel KJ, Beukeboom JJ (2006) Community forestry contributes to the national and millennium development goals without compromising the forestry policy: case studies on community-based forest and natural resources in Bhutan. Department of Forest, Thimphu. http://www.moa.gov.bt/moa/downloads/downloadFiles/MoADownload4ng10456es.pdf. Last accessed 15 Dec 2010
  18. Temphel KJ, Beukeboom JJ (2007) Community forestry in Bhutan contributes to poverty reduction while maintaining the sustainability of the resources. International conference on poverty reduction and forest tenure, market and policy reforms, 3–7 SeptGoogle Scholar
  19. TFDP (2000) Social forestry in eastern Bhutan, Ministry of Agriculture, 3rd forestry development project. Project Facilitation Office, KhangmaGoogle Scholar
  20. Tshering D (2009) Policy, institution and technical bottleneck that limit the expansion of community forestry: a Dzongkhag perspective. In: Proceedings of the national community forestry workshop 2009, Thimphu, 16–17 Apr, pp 33–49Google Scholar
  21. Turkelboom F, Gurung TR, Dukpa D (2001) Role and use of common property resources in Bhutan Himalayas: between tradition and globalization. Brisbane Pacific Regional Meeting for Common Property Resources, 2–4 Sept. http://dlc.dlib.indiana.edu/dlc/bitstream/handle/10535/1294/turkelboom.pdf?sequence=1. Last accessed 15 Dec 2010

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Bhim Rao Ambedkar CollegeUniversity of DelhiYamuna ViharIndia

Personalised recommendations