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Laboratory Test and Assemble of Test Result

  • Nozomu Yoshida
Chapter
  • 1.2k Downloads
Part of the Geotechnical, Geological and Earthquake Engineering book series (GGEE, volume 36)

Abstract

In situ test as a tool to obtain the elastic modulus was discussed in the previous chapter. In addition to the elastic soil properties, it is necessary to determine the nonlinear characteristics of soil for the seismic response analysis. These characteristics can only be evaluated by the laboratory tests.

Keywords

Shear Strength Triaxial Test Hyperbolic Model Elastic Shear Modulus Cyclic Triaxial Test 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nozomu Yoshida
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Civil and Environment EngineeringTohoku Gakuin UniversityMiyagiJapan

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