Advertisement

Using Mobile Media Devices and Apps to Promote Young Children’s Learning

  • Sharon JudgeEmail author
  • Kimberly Floyd
  • Tara Jeffs
Chapter
Part of the Educating the Young Child book series (EDYC, volume 10)

Abstract

In this chapter we describe how mobile technologies, with a focus on smart phones, iPod touches, and iPads or other tablet devices and applications (apps), are transforming learning for young children. This chapter discusses young children’s experiences and learning with mobile media devices and apps. Key opportunities to seize mobile media devices’ unique attributes to improve learning are described. Along with their potential for helping children develop important skills come challenges in using mobile devices for learning that must be addressed. The use of assistive technologies and best practices of Universal Design for Learning provide a viable pathway for needed customization and personalization for young children with disabilities to succeed in using such new and innovative technologies. Finally, implications and insights for education and industry on how to promote young children’s learning via mobile devices and apps are addressed.

Keywords

Applications (apps) Disabilities Media devices Mobile technologies Young children 

References

  1. AssistiveWare. (2013). Proloquo2Go [iTunes app]. https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/proloquo2go/id308368164?mt=8. Accessed 16 March 2013.
  2. Bestwick, A., & Campbell, J. (2010). Mobile learning for all. Exceptional Parent, 40(9), 18–20.Google Scholar
  3. Boone, R., & Higgins, K. (2007). The software checklist: Evaluating educational software for use by students with disabilities. Technology in Action, 3(1), 481–492.Google Scholar
  4. Buckleitner, W. (2010). A taxonomy of touch. Children’s Technology Review, 18(11), 10–11.Google Scholar
  5. Ching, D., Shuler, C., Lewis, A., & Levine, M. H. (2009). Harnessing the potential of mobile technologies for children and learning. In A. Druin (Ed.), Mobile technology for children: Designing for interaction and learning (pp. 23–42). Burlington, MA: Elsevier.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Chiong, C., & Shuler, C. (2010). Learning: Is there an app for that? Investigations of young children’s usage and learning with mobile devices and apps. New York, NY: The Joan Ganz Cooney Center at Sesame Workshop.Google Scholar
  7. Chiong, C., Ree, J., Takeuchi, L., & Erickson, I. (2012). Print books vs. e-books: Comparing parent-child co-reading on print, basic, and enhanced e-book platforms. New York, NY: The Joan Ganz Cooney Center at Sesame Workshop.Google Scholar
  8. Clements, D. H., & Sarama, J. (2005). Young children and technology: What’s appropriate? In W. J. Masalski (Ed.), Technology supported mathematics learning environments 67th yearbook (pp. 51–73). Reston, VA: National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.Google Scholar
  9. Clements, D. H., & Sarama, J. (2007). Effects of a preschool mathematics curriculum: Summative research on the Building Blocks project. Journal for Research in Mathematics Education, 38(2), 136–163.Google Scholar
  10. Cohen, M. (2011). Young children, apps and iPad. http://mcgrc.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/ipad-study-cover-page-report-mcg-info_new-online.pdf Accessed 15 March 2013.
  11. Common, S. M. (2011). Zero to eight: Children’s media use in America. http://www.commonsensemedia.org/sites/default/files/research/zerotoeightfinal2011.pdf. Accessed 12 March 2013.
  12. Family Online Safety Institute. (2013, January). The implications of the FTC’s new COPPA rule. FOSI Briefs. http://www.fosi.org/emailers/fosibriefs-jan2013.html.Accessed 1 March 2013.
  13. Federal Trade Commission. (2012). Mobile apps for kids: Current privacy disclosures are disappointing. http://www.ftc.gov/os.2012/02/120216mobile_apps_kids.pdf.Accessed 23 March 2013.
  14. Field, R. (2005). Favourable conditions for effective and efficient learning in a blended faced-to-face/online method. Proceedings of ASCILITE. http://www.ascilite.org.au/conferences/brisbane05/blogs/proceedings/23_Field.pdf. Accessed 20 March 2013.
  15. Fisch, S. M. (2004). Children’s learning from educational television: Sesame Street and beyond. Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum Associates.Google Scholar
  16. Guernsey, L., Levine, M., Chiong, C., & Severns, M. (2012). Pioneering literacy in the digital wild west: Empowering parents and educators. New York, NY: The Joan Ganz Cooney Center at Sesame Workshop.Google Scholar
  17. Gutnick, A. L., Robb, M., Takeuchi, L., & Kotler, J. (2011). Always connected: The new digital media habits of young children. New York, NY: The Joan Ganz Cooney Center at Sesame Workshop.Google Scholar
  18. Horak, R. (2007). Telecommunications and data communications handbook. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Jundroo LLC. (2012). Bridge Basher [iTunes app]. https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/bridgebasher/id324473106?mt=8. Accessed 23 March 2013.
  20. The kids (books) are alright, says the AAP’s monthly statshot. (21 June 2012). Publishers Weekly.  http://www.publishersweekly.com/pw/by-topic/childrens/childrens-industry-news/article/52632-the-kids-books-are-alright-says-the-aap-s-monthly-statshot.html. Accessed 15 March 2013.
  21. Lieberman, D. A., Bates, C. H., & So, J. (2009). Young children’s learning with digital media. Computers in the Schools, 26(4), 271–283.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Looi, C. K., Seow, P., Zhang, B., So, H. J., Chen, W.-L., & Wong, L. H. (2010). Leveraging mobile technology for sustainable seamless learning: A research agenda. British Journal of Educational Technology, 41, 154–169.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Milbert, S. (2012). The Velveteen Rabbit HD [iTunes app]. https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/the-velveteen-rabbit-hd/id418307824?mt=8. Accessed 10 March 2013.
  24. Minard, A. (2013). My first tangrams HD—A wood tangram puzzle game for kids [iTunes app]. https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/my-first-tangrams-hd-wood/id363843653?mt=8. Accessed 20 March 2013.
  25. Monroe, J. (2013). I love you little bird [iTunes app]. https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/i-love-you-little-bird/id591847496?mt=8. Accessed 23 March 2013.
  26. National Association for the Education of Young Children, & Fred Rogers Center for Early Learning and Children’s Media. (2012). Technology and interactive media as tools in early childhood programs serving children from birth through age 8. http://www.naeyc.org/files/naeyc/file/positions/PS_technology_WEB2.pdf. Accessed 15 Feb 2013.
  27. PBS KIDS. (2010). PBS KIDS iPod app study: Executive summary. http://pbskids.org/read/files/iPod_Report_ExecSum.pdf.Accessed 10 March 2013.
  28. Purcell, K., Entner, R., & Henderson, N. (2010). The rise of apps culture. Washington, DC: Pew Research Center’s Internet and American Life Project. http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2010/The-Rise-of-Apps-Culture.aspx. Accessed 1 March 2013.
  29. Rainie, L., Zickuhr, K., Purcell, K., Madden, M., & Brenner, J. (April 2012). The rise of e-reading. Washington, CD: Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project. http://libraries.pewinternet.org/files/legacy-pdf/The%20rise%20of%20e-reading%204.5.12.pdf. Accessed 1 March 2013.
  30. Revelle, G. (2009). Mobile technologies in support of young children’s learning. In A. Druin (Ed.), Mobile technology for children: Designing for interaction and learning (pp. 265–284). Burlington, MA: Elsevier.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Rogers, Y., & Price, S. (2009). How mobile technologies are changing the way children learn. In A. Druin (Ed.), Mobile technology for children: Designing for interaction and learning (pp. 3–22). Burlington, MA: Elsevier.Google Scholar
  32. Rogers, Y., Price, S., Randell, C., Stanton-Fraser, D., Weal, M., & Fitzpatrick, G. (2005). Ubi-learning: Integrating outdoor and indoor learning experiences. Communications of the ACM, 48(1), 55–59.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Sharples, M., Taylor, J., & Vavoula, G. (2005). Towards a theory of mobile learning. Proceedings of mLearn 2005. http://www.mlearn.org.za/CD/papers/Sharples-%20Theory%20of%20Mobile.pdf. Accessed 15 Dec 2012.
  34. Shore, R. (2008). The power of pow! Wham!: Children, digital media, and our nation’s future, three challenges for the coming decade. New York, NY: The Joan Ganz Cooney Center at Sesame Workshop.Google Scholar
  35. Shuler, C. (2009a). Pockets of potential: Using mobile technologies to promote children’s learning. New York, NY: The Joan Ganz Cooney Center at Sesame Workshop.Google Scholar
  36. Shuler, C. (2009b). iLearn: A content analysis of the iTunes app store’s educational section. New York, NY: The Joan Ganz Cooney Center at Sesame Workshop.Google Scholar
  37. Shuler, C. (2012). iLearnII: An analysis of the education category on Apple’s App Store. New York, NY: The Joan Ganz Cooney Center at Sesame Workshop.Google Scholar
  38. Smith, J. (March 2013). New study pegs Apple’s App Store at 800k apps, 56.2 percent of which are free. Pocket-lint. http://www.pocket-lint.com/news/50594/new-study-pegs-app-store-at-800k#leftswipe. Accessed 15 March 2013.
  39. Sourcebooks. (2013). Put me in the story-personalized books [iTunes app]. https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/put-me-in-story-personalized/id558177381?mt=8. Accessed 17 March 2013.
  40. StusApps. (2013). Builder Blocks Preschool [iTunes app]. https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/builder-blocks-preschool/id391760918?mt=8. Accessed 18 March 2013.
  41. Takeuchi, L. (2011). Families matter: Designing media for a digital age. New York, NY: The Joan Ganz Cooney Center at Sesame Workshop.Google Scholar
  42. Vaala, S., & Takeuchi, L. (2012). Parent co-reading survey: Co-reading with children on iPads: Parents’ perceptions and practices. New York, NY: The Joan Ganz Cooney Center at Sesame Workshop.Google Scholar
  43. Watters, A. (18 November 2011). The children’s app manifesto: Supporting high quality, affordable educational apps. Hack Education. http://www.hackeducation.com/2011/11/18/the-childrens-app-manifesto-supporting-high-quality-affordable-educational-apps/. Accessed 15 March 2013.
  44. Yelland, N. (2005). The future is now: A review of the literature on the use of computers in early childhood education (1994–2004). AACE Journal, 13(3), 201–232.Google Scholar
  45. Zevenbergen, R. (2007). Digital natives come to preschool: Implications for early childhood practice. Contemporary Issue in Early Childhood, 8(1), 19–29.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Old Dominion UniversityNorfolkUSA
  2. 2.West Virginia UniversityMorgantownUSA
  3. 3.Loundon County Public SchoolsAshburnUSA

Personalised recommendations