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The Future of Trees in a Changing Climate: Synopsis

  • Nancy GrulkeEmail author
  • Michael Tausz
Chapter
Part of the Plant Ecophysiology book series (KLEC, volume 9)

Abstract

Trees as long-lived stationary organisms are particularly challenged by rapid changes in their environment, most importantly the recent changes in the Earth’s climate which proceed at unprecedented rates. This volume addressed the main characteristics of tree life with a view to explain and evaluate how the life functions of trees interact with the environment and environmental changes, and how understanding of physiological functions helps to assess how trees may be able to adapt to future conditions. Chapters address specific aspects of tree physiology, such as transport of water and assimilates, water relations, carbon dynamics and allocation, and environmental interactions such as defence chemicals, mycorrhiza, environmental limitations to growth, and impact of pollution. The relevance of each of these processes and aspects of tree life for environmental adaptation is highlighted.

Keywords

Drought Stress Fine Root Stomatal Conductance Fungal Community Severe Drought Stress 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Pacific Northwest Research StationUSDA Forest ServicePrinevilleUSA
  2. 2.Department of Forest and Ecosystem ScienceThe University of MelbourneCreswickAustralia

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