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Religiosity and Subjective Well-Being: An International Perspective

Part of the Cross-Cultural Advancements in Positive Psychology book series (CAPP,volume 9)

Abstract

To what extent does religiosity relate to subjective well-being (SWB) across the world? We review empirical evidence from both Western and non-Western nations and it points to a pan-cultural positive relation between religiosity and SWB. Using a multilevel perspective, we propose psychological and social mechanisms for this process: at the individual level, religiosity fulfills needs; at the national level, collective religiosity can enhance pro-social behaviors. Recent research also points to contextual effects of religiosity. National religiosity can serve as a buffer to SWB against difficult life circumstances; it can also augment personal religiosity effects on SWB. Future research directions on religiosity and SWB are discussed.

Keywords

  • Life Satisfaction
  • Religious Context
  • Religious Individual
  • Western Industrialize Nation
  • National Religiosity

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Correspondence to Louis Tay .

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Tay, L., Li, M., Myers, D., Diener, E. (2014). Religiosity and Subjective Well-Being: An International Perspective. In: Kim-Prieto, C. (eds) Religion and Spirituality Across Cultures. Cross-Cultural Advancements in Positive Psychology, vol 9. Springer, Dordrecht. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-017-8950-9_9

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