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Technology-Enhanced Professional Learning

  • Allison LittlejohnEmail author
  • Anoush Margaryan
Part of the Springer International Handbooks of Education book series (SIHE)

Abstract

Societal and technological changes are transforming the ways people work and learn. As work roles evolve, learning for work becomes continual and personalised. These transformations evidenced in work and learning practices are partly governed by advances in technology. Consideration of work practices, professional learning processes and technologies mediating work and learning within a single domain of ‘Technology-enhanced Professional Learning’ enables analysis of the dialectical relationship between technology and practice. This chapter begins by presenting a single framework that integrates perspectives across the domains of work practices, learning processes and digital technologies. Key trends are outlined from the literature within each domain. Using a framework for TEPL as an analytical lens, emerging work and technology practices and their implications for professional learning both in and for work are examined. Finally, the chapter outlines the implications of these developments for work and learning.

Keywords

Technology-enhanced learning Professional learning E-learning Work-based learning Workplace learning 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Caledonian AcademyGlasgow Caledonian UniversityGlasgowUK

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