Design and Development of the Ultrasound Power Meter with a Three Axis Alignment System for Therapeutic Applications

Conference paper

Abstract

The total output power from medical ultrasound devices must be determined and strictly regulated to ensure patient safety and to evaluate the performance of the ultrasound devices. The objectives of this research were to design and develop an ultrasound power meter with a three axis alignment system to measure the total output power from medical ultrasound devices especially for therapeutic applications. The implementation of this work utilizes a radiation force balance technique based on the method recommended in the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC 61161). An ultrasound therapy machine was used as an ultrasonic source. To verify the performance of the developed system, the total output powers measured from our developed ultrasound power meter were compared with those measured from the commercial ultrasound power meter (UPM) and compared with those measured from the standard ultrasonic power measurement system at the National Institute of Metrology, Thailand (NIMT) at five nominal intensity values (0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 3 W/cm2) with three frequencies, 0.86, 2 and 3 MHz, and four output pulse modes; continuous wave (100 % duty cycle), 1:2 (50 % duty cycle), 1:5 (20 % duty cycle) and 1:10 (10 % duty cycle). The correlation coefficients and measuring uncertainty were then calculated. The results show that the developed system is currently able to determine the ultrasonic output power in the power range from 100 mW to approximately 12 W.

Keywords

Radiation force balance Ultrasonic power measurement Ultrasonic transducer Ultrasound metrology Ultrasound power meter Ultrasound therapy 

Notes

Acknowledgment

The authors would like to thank the financial support provided by the Coordinating Center for Thai Government Science and Technology Scholarship Students (CSTS), National Science and Technology Development Agency (NSTDA). In addition, we gratefully thank the Acoustics and Vibration Department, National Institute of Metrology, Thailand (NIMT) for the use of the standard ultrasonic power measurement system.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Industrial Physics and Medical InstrumentationKing Mongkut’s University of Technology North BangkokBangsue, BangkokThailand

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