Skip to main content

“Blogging my Academic Self”

Abstract

In the present work I apply the theory of identity to prosumption to the act of academic blogging. Prosumption refers to the blurring of production and consumption, and can have identity implications under certain conditions. I show here how the act of blogging for Cyborgology.org facilitated the prosumption of my Academic Self. This occurred as I saw my work in print, received feedback, and gained entre into an academic community. From a feminist perspective, I look critically at the role of blogging as an academic endeavor for women scholars, and by implication, scholars of underrepresented groups more generally. Engaging in blogging is highly laborious and may detract from other activities given greater weight by hiring and tenure committees. At the same time, blogs are useful avenues through which members of underrepresented groups can establish a voice and engage in public dialogue.

Keywords

This is a preview of subscription content, log in via an institution.

Buying options

Chapter
USD   29.95
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Available as PDF
  • Read on any device
  • Instant download
  • Own it forever
eBook
USD   84.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Available as EPUB and PDF
  • Read on any device
  • Instant download
  • Own it forever
Hardcover Book
USD   109.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Durable hardcover edition
  • Dispatched in 3 to 5 business days
  • Free shipping worldwide - see info

Tax calculation will be finalised at checkout

Purchases are for personal use only

Learn about institutional subscriptions

References

  • Banks, D. (2013). Always already augmented. In N. Jurgenson & P. Rey (Eds.), Cyborgology.

    Google Scholar 

  • Bauman, Z. (2005). Liquid life. Cambridge: Polity Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Boesel, W. E. (2012). The hole in our thinking about augmented reality. In N. Jurgenson & P. Rey (Eds.), Cyborgology.

    Google Scholar 

  • Burke, P. J. (2004). Identities and social structure: The 2003 Cooley-Mead Award address. Social Psychology Quarterly, 67, 5–15.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Burke, P. J., & Stets, J. E. (2009). Identity theory. New York: Oxford University Press.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • Cooley, C. H. (1902). Human nature and the social order. New York: Scribner.

    Google Scholar 

  • Davis, J. (2012a). Prosuming identity: The production and consumption of Transableism on Transabled.org. American Behavioral Scientist, 56, 596–617.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Davis, J. (2012b). Pure dualism and pure integration: Take two. In N. Jurgenson & P. Rey (Eds.), Cyborgology.

    Google Scholar 

  • Davis, J., & Jurgenson, N. (2011). Prosuming identity online. In N. Jurgenson & P. Rey (Eds.), Cyborgology.

    Google Scholar 

  • Horkheimer, M., & Adorno, T. W. (1972). The culture industry: Enlightenment as mass deception. Dialectic of enlightenment (pp. 120–167). New York: Herder and Herder.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hurt, C., & Yin, T. (2006). Blogging while untenured and other extreme sports. Washington University Law Review, 84, 1235–1255.

    Google Scholar 

  • Jurgenson, N. (2012). When atoms meet bits: Social media, the mobile web and augmented revolution. Future Internet, 4, 83–91.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Jurgenson, N., & Ritzer, G. (2011). The internet, Web 2.0 and beyond. In G. Ritzer (Ed.), The companion to sociology (pp. 636–648). Malden: Wiley Blackwell.

    Google Scholar 

  • Klein, O., Spears, R., & Reicher, S. (2007). Social identity performance: Extending the strategic side of SIDE. Personality and Social Psychology Review, 11, 28–45.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Rey, P. J. (2012). Social media: You can log off but you can’t opt out. In N. Jurgenson & P. Rey (Eds.), Cyborgology.

    Google Scholar 

  • Ritzer, G., & Jurgenson, N. (2010). Production, consumption, prosumption: The nature of capitalism in the age of the digital prosumer. Journal of Consumer Culture, 10, 13–36.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Ritzer, G., Dean, P., & Jurgenson, N. (2012). The coming of age of the prosumer. American Behavioral Scientist, 56, 379–398.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Schraube, E. (2009). Technology as materialized action and its ambivalences. Theory & Psychology, 19, 296–312.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Smith-Lovin, L. (2007). The strength of weak identities: Social structural sources of self, situation and emotional experience. Social Psychology Quarterly, 70, 106–124.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Stryker, S., & Burke, P. J. (2000). The past, present, and future of an identity theory. Social Psychology Quarterly, 63, 284–297.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Toffler, A. (1980). The third wave. New York: William Morrow.

    Google Scholar 

  • Wanenchak, S. (2013). All my digital dualist feels. In N. Jurgenson & P. Rey (Eds.), Cyborgology.

    Google Scholar 

  • Wilson, T. D., & Dunn, E. W. (2004). Self-knowledge: Its limits, value, and potential for improvement. Annual Review of Psychology, 55, 493–518.

    Article  Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Jenny L. Davis .

Editor information

Editors and Affiliations

Rights and permissions

Reprints and permissions

Copyright information

© 2014 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht

About this chapter

Cite this chapter

Davis, J. (2014). “Blogging my Academic Self”. In: Farris, D., Davis, M., Compton, D. (eds) Illuminating How Identities, Stereotypes and Inequalities Matter through Gender Studies. Springer, Dordrecht. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-017-8718-5_1

Download citation

Publish with us

Policies and ethics