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The Study and Practice of Economics in Ghana

  • L. Boakye-Yiadom
  • William Baah-Boateng
  • Abena D. Oduro
Chapter

Abstract

Against the backdrop of developments in the Ghanaian economy and the evolution of economics as a discipline, this chapter traces the evolution of the study and practice of economics in Ghana. The major thematic areas are the teaching of economics at the University of Ghana, economic research in Ghana, and economic policy-making. Under the theme of the teaching of economics at the University of Ghana, the chapter assesses the changes in the programmes of the Department of Economics, what motivated the changes, and the challenges of teaching economics in Ghana. Regarding economic research, we focus on the patterns, trends, and underlying factors. We also highlight constraints to economic research in Ghana, as well as the enhanced opportunities. The third thematic area examines the relationship between researchers in economics and policy-makers. This is done by examining the available institutional framework for facilitating such a relationship and the relevance of economic research to policy-makers.

Keywords

Economics Ghana Academic programmes Economic research Policy makers 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. Boakye-Yiadom
    • 1
  • William Baah-Boateng
    • 1
  • Abena D. Oduro
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of EconomicsUniversity of GhanaLegonGhana

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