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The Interconnectivity of Trust in Schools

Abstract

This chapter explores the interrelationships of trust across various role groups in schools, in particular the extent to which faculty trust in principals, colleagues, and clients, parent trust in schools, and student trust in teachers are correlated to one another. In addition, the extent to which this set of interrelated trust variables works in concert as well as independently to explain variance in student achievement at the elementary, middle school, and high school levels is explored. The participants were students, parents, and teachers from 64 elementary, middle, and high schools in one mid-Atlantic state. Implications for practice and leadership preparation are discussed, as well as directions for future research.

Keywords

  • Interrelationships of Trust
  • Faculty Trust
  • Parent Trust
  • Student Trust
  • Student Achievement

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Tschannen-Moran, M. (2014). The Interconnectivity of Trust in Schools. In: Van Maele, D., Forsyth, P., Van Houtte, M. (eds) Trust and School Life. Springer, Dordrecht. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-017-8014-8_3

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