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The Continuing Emergence of Art Therapy in Prisons

  • David E. Gussak
Chapter

Abstract

While it is clear that prison populations require mental health attention, there are some fundamental difficulties with providing care to those that cannot or should not admit to weaknesses and vulnerabilities or may even lie for their own benefits and gains. However, research has revealed that art therapy may be an effective approach for addressing mental health issues in correctional settings. This chapter presents the difficulties of providing mental health care to inmates, a short overview of tarts in American prison, and recent theories on the advantages of art therapy in prison. It will also provide recent empirical research that has determined that indeed art therapy is effective in addressing issues pervasive with the prison population, particularly depression, locus of control and problem-solving skills. Such results have naturally led to various art- programs as introduced at the end of this chapter.

Keywords

Prison Population Correctional Setting Prison Inmate Correctional Institution Female Inmate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Art EducationFlorida State UniversityTallahasseeUSA

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