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Patterns of Hominin Occupation and Cultural Diversity Across the Gebel Akhdar of Northern Libya Over the Last ~200 kyr

  • Sacha JonesEmail author
  • Annita Antoniadou
  • Huw Barton
  • Nick Drake
  • Lucy Farr
  • Chris Hunt
  • Robyn Inglis
  • Tim Reynolds
  • Kevin White
  • Graeme Barker
Part of the Vertebrate Paleobiology and Paleoanthropology book series (VERT)

Abstract

Excavations at Haua Fteah cave in Cyrenaica, Libya, have revealed a cultural sequence that may span the last glacial–interglacial-glacial cycle. The TRANS-NAP project has been re-excavating Haua Fteah and conducting geoarchaeological survey of an ecologically diverse landscape that includes the fertile Gebel Akhdar and littoral, pre-desert, and desert biomes. A major aim of this project is to characterize cultural and environmental changes across the region and correlate the surface archaeology with that from Haua Fteah. To date, 181 sites have been recorded, ranging from the Middle Stone Age (MSA) to Late Stone Age (LSA). Their geographic distribution suggests temporal variation in patterns of hominin habitat preference, with significantly more LSA than MSA sites at higher elevations. The surface archaeology also points to substantial spatiotemporal technological variation within the MSA. These patterns may be explained by both paleoenvironmental change and paleodemographic shifts in the region, resulting in a variety of hominin adaptive responses.

Keywords

Cyrenaica Middle Stone Age Late Stone Age Haua Fteah Mediterranean littoral Sahara Dispersal routes 

Notes

Acknowledgments

Data presented in this paper were collected during four field seasons from 2007 to 2010 and involved numerous team members to whom we are most grateful. We thank the Department of Antiquities of Libya for permission to undertake this work and the European Research Council and the Society for Libyan Studies for financial support. We are indebted to our colleagues in Libya for their support, including Giuma Anag, Salah Aghab, Ahmed Buzaian, Ahmed Saber, Mohammed Twati, and the late Abdulgader Mzeine. We thank the three reviewers for their important and helpful comments.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sacha Jones
    • 1
    Email author
  • Annita Antoniadou
    • 2
  • Huw Barton
    • 3
  • Nick Drake
    • 4
  • Lucy Farr
    • 1
  • Chris Hunt
    • 5
  • Robyn Inglis
    • 6
  • Tim Reynolds
    • 7
  • Kevin White
    • 8
  • Graeme Barker
    • 1
  1. 1.McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research, University of CambridgeCambridgeUK
  2. 2.School of Geography, Archaeology and Palaeoecology, Queen’s UniversityNorthern IrelandUK
  3. 3.School of Archaeology and Ancient History, University of LeicesterLeicesterUK
  4. 4.Department of GeographyKing’s College LondonLondonUK
  5. 5.School of Natural Sciences and Psychology, Liverpool John Moores UniversityLiverpoolUK
  6. 6.Department of ArchaeologyUniversity of YorkYorkUK
  7. 7.Department of History, Classics & Archaeology, BirkbeckUniversity of LondonLondonUK
  8. 8.Department of GeographyUniversity of ReadingReadingUK

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