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Intercontinental Dispersal I

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Abstract

We propose to analyze in this chapter patterns of distribution that interest the five continents. In order to conduct our investigation against the proper background of distance, we will follow from beginning to end the tracks that make these patterns out, briefly commenting upon their course as necessity requires.

Keywords

Indian Ocean Canary Island Secondary Center Secondary Migration North Temperate Zone 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1952

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