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Conclusion: Problematic Subjectivism

  • Richard T. Murphy
Part of the Phaenomenologica book series (PHAE, volume 79)

Abstract

This study was undertaken in the awareness that Hume’s skeptical and psychologistic philosophy was anathema to Husserl. Husserl, nonetheless, had studied intensively Hume’s A Treatise of Human Nature. At issue was Hume’s impact on Husserl’s development of transcendental-genetic phenomenology. By design we have focused on Husserl’s favorable reactions to Hume in areas crucial to genetic reduction. If we have minimized the profound doctrinal differences between these two thinkers, these are too obvious to require elucidation. What we have attempted is to determine Hume’s positive contribution to the eidetic and, especially, the genetic reduction proper to Husserl’s phenomenology. This study’s main thrust was to reveal the developing affinity between the Humean “science of human nature” and the Husserlian genetic phenomenology. Central to both theories is the uncompromising move towards a truly radical subjectivism. The background question haunting this entire study has been this. Has Husserl actually avoided, in conformity to his own claim, the “bankruptcy” of skeptical solipsism more successfully than Hume?

Keywords

Human Nature Radical Subjectivism Rigorous Science Problematic Subjectivism Cartesian Meditation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Conclusion Notes

  1. 1.
    Husserl, Die Krisis, p. 433 (Beilage XI).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Husserl, The Crisis of European Sciences, p. 98; Die Krisis, p. 101.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Husserl, Cartesian Meditations, p. 23; Cartesianische Meditationen, p. 62.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Husserl, Erste Philosophie, vol.!, p. 173.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Cf. supra, p. 96.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Husserl, Formal and Transcendental Logic, p. 256; Formale und Transzendentale Logik, p. 263.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Cf. supra, pp. 152–53.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Husserl, Erste Philosophie, vol.!, p. 173.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Husserl, Formal and Transcendental Logic, p. 256; Formale und Transzendentale Logik, p. 263.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Cf. supra, pp. 185–87.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Hume, Treatise, p. 272.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Ibid., p. 273.Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Ibid., p.xvi (Introduction).Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Ibid., p. 273.Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Phénoménologie de la perception.Paris: Librairie Gallimard, 1945, pp. v-ix (Avant-propos).Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    . Cf. Husserl, Cartesian Meditations,pp. 14–16; Cartesianische Meditationen,pp. 55–57.Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    Husserl, Internal Time Consciousness,p. 109;Zeitbewusstseins,p. 83.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard T. Murphy
    • 1
  1. 1.Boston CollegeUSA

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