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Orchestration of the Universe: Reflections on Tagore’s Creativity

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Part of the Analecta Husserliana book series (ANHU, volume 63)

Abstract

The uniquely metaphorical phrase “bipul visva-ganer banya1 occurs in Tagore’s congregational address “Shona” (auditory perception).2 The deluge of magnanimous orchestration of the universe is so vital a metaphor that he can affirm in full faith: “This is neither a poetic utterance nor a rhetorical phrase; throughout space and time a continuous orchestration is being reverberated in grand fulness”3 (my translation).

Keywords

Tactile Sensation Heavenly Body Sonic Property Poetical Work Dance Music 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

  1. 1.
    Rabindranath Tagore, “Shona,” Santiniketan, Rabindra Rachanavali (henceforth abbreviated as RR followed by volume number), Birthday Centenary Edition, Govt. of West Bengal, Calcutta, 1961, vol. 12, p. 127.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Ibid., pp. 126–128.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Ibid., p. 127.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Dekha,“ Santiniketan, Ibid., pp. 124–126.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Ibid., p. 126.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Ibid., p. 126.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Shona,“ op. cit., p. 127.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Rabindranath Tagore, Gitabitan (collection of songs), Part I, song no. 321, “Puja” (devotional category), Visva-Bharati, 1970 edition, p. 135.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Om,“ Santiniketan, RR 12, pp. 256–258.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Sahitya“ (literature, signifying the sense of union of the human souls), Sahityer Pathe (towards the path of togetherness, i.e., literature and the arts), RR 14, p. 310.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Chhanda, RR 14, p. 268.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    The Pelican History of Music, vol. I, 1960 edition, p. 36.Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    The Oxford History of Music, vol. I, Oxford University Press, London (1957), reprint 1960, p. 196.Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Ananda Kentish Coomaraswamy, The Dance of Shiva, The Noonday Press, New York, 1957, pp. 95–96.Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Sitansu Ray, “The Tagore-Einstein Conversations: Reality and Human World, Causality and Chance,” Analecta Husserliana vol. XLVII, Ed. A. T. Tymieniecka, Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1995, pp. 59–65.Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    From “Bhumika,” the introductory lyric of Tagore’s Gitabitan, op. cit., p. 1.Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    Patraput, RR 3, p. 350.Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    Japanyatri, RR 10, pp. 492–494.Google Scholar
  19. 19.
    Chhinnapatravali (a cluster of scattered letters), RR 11, p. 82.Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    Galpaguchchha (a cluster of stories), RR 7, p. 679.Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    Manas Sundari,“ Sonar Tari, RR 1, p. 390.Google Scholar
  22. 22.
    Jyotsna,“ Chitra, RR 1, p. 469.Google Scholar
  23. 23.
    Gitabitan (collection of songs), RR 4, p. 218.Google Scholar
  24. 24.
    RR 3, p. 636.Google Scholar
  25. 25.
    Chhinnapatravali (collection of letters), letter no. 119, RR 11, p. 133.Google Scholar
  26. 26.
    Ibid., letter no. 148, p. 165.Google Scholar
  27. 27.
    Gitabitan, RR 4, op. cit., pp. 417–418.Google Scholar
  28. 28.
    Ibid., pp. 417–418.Google Scholar
  29. 29.
    Ibid., p. 418.Google Scholar
  30. 30.
    Ibid., pp. 418–419.Google Scholar
  31. 31.
    Nataraja: Riturangashala, RR 5, pp. 619–663.Google Scholar
  32. 32.
    Gitabitan, op. cit., p. 159.Google Scholar
  33. 33.
    Ibid., p. 159.Google Scholar
  34. 34.
    Ibid., p. 253.Google Scholar
  35. 35.
    Ibid., p. 228.Google Scholar
  36. 36.
    Prof. R. Murray Schafer, “The Music of the Environment,” Cultures, Vol. 1, No. 1, UNESCO, Paris, 1973, p. 17.Google Scholar
  37. 37.
    Shabda Tattwa, RR 14, pp. 32–38.Google Scholar
  38. 38.
    Bhumika“ (preface), Gitabitan, RR 4, op. cit., p. 1.Google Scholar
  39. 39.
    Pancha Bhoota, RR 14, pp. 673–675.Google Scholar
  40. 40.
    Quoted by Tagore, Alochana, RR 14, p. 594.Google Scholar
  41. 41.
    Gitabitan, RR 4, p. 102.Google Scholar
  42. 42.
    Ibid., p. 58.Google Scholar
  43. 43.
    Puja,“ song no. 317, Ibid., p. 102.Google Scholar
  44. 44.
    Ibid., p. 3.Google Scholar
  45. 45.
    The Ganges of Heaven as is believed by the Hindus.Google Scholar
  46. 46.
    A kind of sweet-scented golden flower.Google Scholar
  47. 47.
    Puja,“ No. 3, Gitabitan, op. cit., pp. 3–4. The whole creation is conceived as an ever-flowing sonorous stream.Google Scholar
  48. 48.
    Puja,“ no. 4, Ibid., p. 4. Suradhuni is another synonym of Mandakini, i.e., the Ganges of the Heavens.Google Scholar
  49. 49.
    Puja,“ no. 6, Ibid., p. 4.Google Scholar
  50. 50.
    Santidev Ghosh, Rabindra Sangit, Visva Bharati, Calcutta, 1365 Bengali Era, p. 207.Google Scholar
  51. 51.
    Puja,“ no. 158, Ibid., p. 55.Google Scholar
  52. 52.
    Puja,“ no. 35, Ibid., p. 14.Google Scholar
  53. 53.
    Prakriti“ (nature), no. 1, Ibid., pp. 329–330.Google Scholar
  54. 54.
    Prakriti,“ no. 8, Ibid., pp. 331–332.Google Scholar
  55. 55.
    The dance-drama Chitrangada, Ibid., pp. 551–552.Google Scholar
  56. 56.
    Prakriti“ no. 27, Ibid. pp. 337–338.Google Scholar
  57. 57.
    Rabindranath Tagore, Personality, Macmillan, 1917, Indian reprint 1985, pp. 41–76.Google Scholar
  58. 58.
    Ibid., pp. 54–55.Google Scholar
  59. 59.
    Rabindranath Tagore, “The Poem No. 43” (written as a letter to Amiya Chakravarty). Shesh Saptak (the extreme octave), RR 3, p. 218.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Visva-Bharati UniversitySantiniketanIndia

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