Bud Dormancy; Phenomenon, Problems and Solutions in the Tropics and Subtropics

  • Amnon Erez
Chapter

Abstract

Marked increases in production of temperate fruit crops have occurred in many subtropical and tropical countries (Table 1). One of the major limitations of production in warm countries is overcoming the dormancy period typical of all temperate zone fruit trees.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Amnon Erez
    • 1
  1. 1.The Volcani Center, Institute of HorticultureA.R.O.Bet-DaganIsrael

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