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Some Aspects of Monotropoid Mycorrhizas

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Abstract

Monotropoid mycorrhiza occurs in species of Monotropa, non-chlorophyllous plants growing under forest trees like Fagus, Pinus, Quercus and Salix as epiparasites depending on the fungal partner. Monotropa and associated trees are connected by mycelium of a common mycorrhizal fungus Boletus. This association is very similar to orchidoid mycorrhiza. The host cells are penetrated by hyphal pegs restricted to epidermal layers.

Keywords

  • Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus
  • Arbuscular Mycorrhizal
  • Mycorrhizal Fungus
  • Ectomycorrhizal Fungus
  • Mycorrhizal Root

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Manoharachary, C., Kunwar, I.K., Mukerji, K.G. (2002). Some Aspects of Monotropoid Mycorrhizas. In: Mukerji, K.G., Manoharachary, C., Chamola, B.P. (eds) Techniques in Mycorrhizal Studies. Springer, Dordrecht. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-017-3209-3_22

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-017-3209-3_22

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Dordrecht

  • Print ISBN: 978-90-481-5985-7

  • Online ISBN: 978-94-017-3209-3

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