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Nutrient Cycling in Sandy Beaches

  • K. B. Pugh
Conference paper
Part of the Developments in Hydrobiology book series (DIHY, volume 19)

Abstract

The statement (Pugh 1975) that marine sandy beaches are, for the most part a chemical and microbiological “no man’s land” remains true in 1983, for still the majority of marine chemists and microbiologists have stopped short at the low water mark, and their soil science colleagues have not ventured beyond the sand dunes. Between these boundaries lies a complex inter-relationship of uncontrollable and continuously varying factors, e.g. sediments, tides, temperature, light, nutrients, etc. Perhaps it is this inherent variability that has dispelled the courage, and dampened the exploratory urge, of so many chemists and microbiologists.

Keywords

Chemical Oxygen Demand Nutrient Cycle Sandy Beach Sand Column Experimental Marine Biology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. B. Pugh
    • 1
  1. 1.North East River Purification BoardPersley, AberdeenUK

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