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The Law of Definite Proportions

  • Pierre Duhem
Part of the Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science book series (BSPS, volume 223)

Abstract

Those [53] who have read the authors of the seventeenth century and, particularly, the eighteenth century, will be quite surprised to hear that Proust is credited with establishing the law of definite proportions. All these authors seem to admit, and several formally state, the following truth: when two substances combine together, the mass of the one stands in a fixed relation to the mass of the other.

Keywords

Foreign Body Eighteenth Century Physical Mixture Chemical Combination Fixed Relation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pierre Duhem

There are no affiliations available

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