The Safety of Bacterial Microbial Agents Used for Black Fly and Mosquito Control in Aquatic Environments

  • Lawrence A. Lacey
  • Richard W. Merritt
Chapter
Part of the Progress in Biological Control book series (PIBC, volume 1)

Abstract

Aquatic environments are important habitats for a multitude of species, complex food webs and the predominant sources of the essential requisite for all life in the biosphere — water. Insects contribute to several levels of the food web in aquatic systems and a multitude of terrestrial organisms that, in turn, depend on them. In the 1970’s and 1980’s insects became the dominant forms used in freshwater investigations of basic ecological inquiry (Barnes & Minshall 1983).

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  • Lawrence A. Lacey
  • Richard W. Merritt

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