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The Textbook Presentation of Economic Discourse

Chapter
Part of the Recent Economic Thought Series book series (RETH, volume 21)

Abstract

Economic discourse is elusive and frustrating to anyone who tries to enter its maze of questions, terms, diagrams, and models. Most freshmen glare incomprehensibly when the scarcity of resources is urged upon them. When they hear “production possibility curves,” “rational choice,” and “upward sloping supply curves,” they may believe themselves to be in some foreign language class. The mapping of their world in geometric patterns and algebraic formulas does not make much sense. Even though they are constantly bombarded with abstractions in their cultural environment, the thinking in abstract terms that economists do is not natural to most students. The incongruity with common talk makes economics hard.

Keywords

Seventh Edition Introductory Chapter Introductory Text Economic Discourse Methodological Argument 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

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