Distribution of mangrove species in Australia

  • A. G. Wells
Part of the Tasks for vegetation science book series (TAVS, volume 8)

Abstract

In Australia, mangroves occur in small pockets around the coastline. They are most prominent around the northern coastline and have only isolated occurrences in Victoria, South Australia and south of Carnarvon in Western Australia. No mangrove species is recorded for Tasmania.

The geographical location of the continent provides scope to look at present distribution of the various species through an extremely wide latitudinal range (11°–38° S). Many species show restricted distributions which may be attributed to past and present historical and environmental conditions. The number of mangrove species in Australia (33) decreases with increasing latitude with most distributions extending further down the eastern than the western coastline and at the southernmost limit of mangroves in the world — Corner Inlet, Victoria (38°45′ S, 146°30′ E) — only the species Avicennia marina var. australasica remains.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. G. Wells
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Environmental Physics, School of PhysicsUniversity of SydneyAustralia

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