Advertisement

Improving rice tolerance to barnyardgrass through early crop vigour: simulations with INTERCOM

  • J. L. Lindquist
  • M. J. Kropff
Part of the Systems Approaches for Sustainable Agricultural Development book series (SAAD, volume 6)

Abstract

Crop yields on-farm rarely approach their production potential, partly as a result of growth reduction due to weed interference. The ability of rice to maintain yield in the presence of barnyardgrass (a measure of tolerance) may be improved if the time between emergence or transplanting and canopy closure is decreased. This may be accomplished through manipulation of crop population density and spatial arrangement, or improvement of early crop vigour. A simulation model of rice-bamyardgrass competition for light (INTERCOM) was used to evaluate the influence of increased early vigour in rice on its tolerance to barnyardgrass. Simulations suggest that increasing early leaf area expansion and height growth rates in rice will reduce yield loss. Correlation between early crop vigour and rice tolerance to barnyardgrass in the field is warranted. Rice cultivars with improved tolerance may improve yield stability in the presence of low barnyardgrass populations.

Key words

crop tolerance crop-weed competition rice ecosystem agricultural development plant breeding yield stability 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Callaway M B (1992) A compendium of crop varietal tolerance to weeds. Am. J. Alt. Agric. 7: 169–180.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Cousens R (1985) An empirical model relating crop yield to weed and crop density and a statistical comparison with other models. J. Agric. Sci. 105: 513–521.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Dingkuhn M, Penning de Vries F W T, Miézan K M (1993) Improvement of rice plant type concepts: Systems research enables interaction of physiology and breeding. Pages 19–35 in Penning de Vries F W T, Teng P S, Metselaar K (Eds.) Systems approaches for agricultural development. Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht, The Netherlands.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Forcella F (1987) Tolerance of weed competition associated with high leaf area expansion rate in tall fescue. Crop Sci. 27: 146–147.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Hunt L A (1993) Designing improved plant types: A breeder’s viewpoint. Pages 3–17 in Penning de Vries F W T, Teng P S, Metselaar K (Eds.) Systems approaches for agricultural development. Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht, The Netherlands.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. IRRI — International Rice Research Institute (1990) IRRI rice facts. International Rice Research Institute, P.O. Box 933, Manila, Philippines. 5 p.Google Scholar
  7. Jennings P R, Aquino R C (1968) Studies on competition in rice. III. The mechanisms of competition among phenotypes. Evolution 22: 529–542.Google Scholar
  8. Jordan N (1993) Prospects for weed control through crop interference. Ecol. Applic. 3: 84–91.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Kropff M J (1993) Mechanisms of competition for light. Pages 33–61 in Kropff M J, Van Laar H H (Eds.) Modelling crop-weed interactions. CAB International, Wallingford, UK.Google Scholar
  10. Kropff M J, Lotz L A P (1993) Eco-physiological characterization of the species. Pages 83–104 in KropffGoogle Scholar
  11. M J, Van Laar H H (Eds.) Modelling crop-weed interactions. CAB Intemational, Wallingford, UK. Kropff M J, Van Laar H H (Eds.) (1993) Modelling crop-weed interactions. CAB International, Wallingford, UK. 274 p.Google Scholar
  12. Kropff M J, Weaver S E, Lotz L A P, Lindquist J L, Joenje W, Schnieders B J, Van Keulen N C, Migo T R, Fajardo F F (1993) Understanding crop-weed interaction in field situations. Pages 105–136 in Kropff M J, van Laar H H (Eds.) Modelling crop-weed interactions. CAB International, Wallingford, UK.Google Scholar
  13. Kropff M J, Moody K, Lindquist J L, Migo T R, Fajardo F F (1994a) Models to predict yield loss due to weeds in rice ecosystems. Phil. J. Weed Sci. (Special Issue):29— 44.Google Scholar
  14. Kropff M J, Van Laar H H, Matthews R B (Eds.) (1994b) ORYZAI: An ecophysiological model for irrigated rice production. SARP Research Proceedings, Intemational Rice Research Institute, P.O. Box 933, Manila, Philippines. 1 10 p.Google Scholar
  15. Kropff M J, Van Laar H H, Matthews R B, Goudriaan J, Ten Berge H F M (1994c) Description of the model ORYZAI (Version 1.3). Pages 5–41 in Kropff M J, Van Laar H H, Matthews R B (Eds.) ORYZAI: An ecophysiological model for irrigated rice production. SARP Research Proceedings, Intemational Rice Research Institute, P.O. Box 933, Manila, Philippines.Google Scholar
  16. Kropff M J, Van Laar H H, Matthews R B, Torres R O, Peng S, Cassman K G (1994d) Model parameterization. Pagers 43–55 in Kropff M J, Van Laar H H, Matthews R B (Eds.) ORYZAI: An ecophysiological model for irrigated rice production. SARP Research Proceedings, Intemational Rice Research Institute, P.O. Box 933, Manila, Philippines.Google Scholar
  17. Lindquist J L, Kropff M J (1996) Applications of an ecophysiological model for irrigated rice (Oryza sativa) — Echinochloa competition. Weed Sci. 44: 52–56.Google Scholar
  18. Lindquist J L, Maxwell B D, Buhler D D, Gunsolus J L (1995) Modelling the population dynamics and economics of velvetleaf (Abutilon theophrasti) control in a corn (Zea mays)—soybean (Glycine max) rotation. Weed Sci. 43: 269–275.Google Scholar
  19. Moody K (1988) Developing appropriate weed management strategies for small-scale farmers. Pages 319–330 in Altieri M A, Liebmann M (Eds.) Weed management in agroecosystems: Ecological approaches. CRC Press Inc., Boca Raton, FL, USA.Google Scholar
  20. Sutoro, Makarim A K (1994) Variability in crop physiological inputs used in simulation models of rice. Pages 107–112 in Aggarwal P K, Matthews R B, Kropff M J, Van Laar H H (Eds.) Applications of systems approaches in plant breeding. SARP Research Proceedings, International Rice Research Institute, P.O. Box 933, Manila, Philippines.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. L. Lindquist
    • 1
  • M. J. Kropff
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of AgronomyUniversity of NebraskaLincolnUSA
  2. 2.Department of Theoretical Production EcologyWageningen Agricultural UniversityWageningenThe Netherlands

Personalised recommendations