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Ethics of Managed Care: In Search of Grounding

  • Mary Ann G. Cutter
Part of the Philosophy and Medicine book series (PHME, volume 76)

Abstract

Much has changed in American health care. For many years, the medical profession has exercised a virtual monopoly over the training, tools, and concepts of health and disease, primarily through laws of licensure and prescription, and a nearly singular economic control over volume, kind, and price of services. This situation has changed in the last few decades, due in part to the emergence of managed care.’ As those who pay the costs of care reconsider what they will buy and how much they will pay, the medical profession’s influence over consumers’ options for treatment of their disease is weakening rapidly. Physicians are becoming one of the many (including patients, interest groups, employers, government, insurance companies, health care institutions, and bioethicists) who have power over how disease is defined, diagnosed, and treated.

Keywords

Medical Knowledge Health Care Institution Moral Knowledge Moral Content Professional Integrity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mary Ann G. Cutter
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Colorado, Colorado SpringsColorado SpringsUSA

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