Advertisement

Managed Care and the Practice of the Professions

  • Christopher Tollefsen
Part of the Philosophy and Medicine book series (PHME, volume 76)

Abstract

We owe Professor Pellegrino (2002) and Professor Boisaubin (2002) a debt of gratitude for bringing to light a number of difficulties faced by the medical profession in addressing the new framework of managed care. I have a great deal of sympathy for much of what they say. In this paper, however, I plan to focus not so much on the specifics they address, as on a more general issue. Managed care introduces new moral quandaries into the profession of medicine -- so much so as to put the profession itself in jeopardy, on Dr. Pellegrino’s account. In this paper I plan to focus primarily on providing a framework for understanding the professions and professional ethics at a high level of generality. I think the framework I will provide helps us to give conceptual shape to the work of Pellegrino and Boisaubin, and also to raise some critical questions about the relationship between the profession of medicine and its institutional structures. These are questions I will raise at the conclusion of the paper.

Keywords

Distributive Justice Common Good Institutional Structure Moral Language Internal Good 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Boisaubin, E. (2002). `Ethical dilemmas in managed care for the practitioner.’ In: W. Bondeson and J. Jones (Eds.), The Ethics of Managed Care: Professional Integrity and Patient Rights (pp. 19–28 ). Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers.Google Scholar
  2. Brandeis, L. (1914). `Opportunity in the law.’ Business as a Profession. Available online: www.law.du.eduhussell/lh/alh/docs/brandeis.htmlGoogle Scholar
  3. Khushf, G. (2002). `A radical challenge to the traditional conception of medicine: On the need to move beyond economic factors when considering the ethics of managed care.’ In: W. Bondeson and J. Jones (Eds.), The Ethics of Managed Care: Professional Integrity and Patient Rights (pp. 75–91 ).Google Scholar
  4. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers.Google Scholar
  5. Maclntyre, A. (1984). After Virtue, 2°d edition. Notre Dame: University of Notre Dame Press.Google Scholar
  6. Pellegrino, E.D. (1979). `Toward a reconstruction of medical morality: The primacy of the act of profession and the fact of illness.’ The Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 4, 32–56.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Pellegrino, E.D. (2002). `Rationing health care: Inherent conflicts within the concept of justice.’ In: W. Bondeson and J. Jones (Eds.), The Ethics of Managed Care: Professional Integrity and Patient Rights (pp. 1–18 ). Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic PublishersGoogle Scholar
  8. Simon, W. (1998). The Practice of Justice: A Theory of Lawyer’s Ethics. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christopher Tollefsen
    • 1
  1. 1.University of South CarolinaColumbiaUSA

Personalised recommendations