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Margaret Lindsay Huggins (1848–1915) Pioneering Astrophysicist

  • Susan M. P. McKenna-Lawlor
Part of the Astrophysics and Space Science Library book series (ASSL, volume 292)

Abstract

Margaret Lindsay Huggins (née Murray) was born in Dublin in 1848, the elder child of John Majoribanks Murray and his first wife Helen Lindsay, both of whom came to Ireland from Scotland. John Murray trained to become a solicitor at King’s Inns in Dublin and, thereafter, went on to establish his own legal practice in that city. Margaret and her brother Robert, who was by three years her junior, were brought up in a spacious Georgian House located in the, then, suburb of Monkstown, close to the sea. In 1857, when Margaret was only nine years old, her mother died. Her father later remarried and his second wife Elizabeth (née Pott) gave birth to two sons and a daughter.

Keywords

Royal Society Science Progress Stellar Spectrum Comparison Spectrum Heavenly Body 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Susan M. P. McKenna-Lawlor
    • 1
  1. 1.Space Technology Ireland Ltd.National University of IrelandMaynooth, Co. KildareIreland

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