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Buddhist Views of Nature and the Environment

  • Leslie E. Sponsel
  • Poranee Natadecha-Sponsel
Part of the Science Across Cultures: The History of Non-Western Science book series (SACH, volume 4)

Abstract

The Three Refuges chant that usually begins Buddhist ceremonies reflects the three ultimate components of Buddhism. One becomes a Buddhist by accepting and pursuing the three. The route to enlightenment commences with accepting the Dhamma [dharma] (teachings), starting with the Four Noble Truths, and then following the Noble Eightfold Path (explained below).1

Keywords

Environmental Ethic Green Society Buddhist Practice Southeast Asian Study Buddhist Perspective 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Authors and Affiliations

  • Leslie E. Sponsel
  • Poranee Natadecha-Sponsel

There are no affiliations available

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