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Molecular Responses to Oxidative Stress

  • John G. Scandalios
Chapter
Part of the Springer Handbook Series of Plant Ecophysiology book series (KLEC, volume 1)

Abstract

The evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis altered the Earth’s atmosphere and enabled the development and sustenance of aerobic life. Thus, molecular oxygen is essential for life on Earth. However, the incomplete reduction of dioxygen (02) to water (H20) during normal aerobic metabolism generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) that pose a serious threat to all aerobic organisms (Fridovich, 1975). At the same time, it has become increasingly clear that ROS, in addition to their role as toxic agents, are also used as second messengers in various signal transduction pathways, and in many types of biological defense mechanisms (Scandalios, 1997). Thus, in addition to the historic perception of ROS as toxic and lethal agents, recent evidence indicates that they play beneficial roles as well.

Keywords

Oxidative Stress Molecular Response Antioxidant Gene Aerobic Organism Antioxidant Responsive Element 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • John G. Scandalios
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of GeneticsNorth Carolina State UniversityRaleighUSA

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