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Personal Budgets for the Elderly: A Case Study in Dutch Solidarity

  • Rob Houtepen
  • Ruud ter Meulen
Part of the Philosophy and Medicine book series (PHME, volume 69)

Abstract

Although the Dutch elderly are not officially discriminated against by age criteria or policy regulations, they are intensively ‘touched’ by the scarcity of resources and by the policy attempts to manage this scarcity. Especially, the increasing waiting lists for home care and nursing home care, the introduction of systems requiring more private funding and personal financial responsibility and the (possible) rationing of acute care services on the basis of economic evidence are examples of the way the elderly are unequally treated by society particularly with respect to their access to care services.

Keywords

Home Care Elderly User Nursing Home Care Private Funding Care Receiver 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rob Houtepen
  • Ruud ter Meulen

There are no affiliations available

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