Advertisement

Physical and Mathematical Theories

  • R. Hooykaas
Chapter
  • 190 Downloads
Part of the Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science book series (BSPS, volume 205)

Abstract

Hypotheses and the theories built upon them are of two main types:
  1. 1)

    they may be intended as constructs conformable with physical reality;

     
  2. 2)

    they may be only conventions which need not be true but which are useful in describing and predicting facts.

     

Both types demand that hypotheses and theories should be as simple as possible; the latter for methodological reasons (theories should be as simple as possible); the former for ontological reasons (nature is believed to be simple and economical in its means). In the long run the two types of hypotheses and theories frequently converge.

Keywords

Physical Reality Transverse Vibration Undulatory Theory Chapter VIII Heavenly Body 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Notes

  1. 1.
    G. Berkeley, Siris; Or a Chain of Philosophical Reflections and Inquiries Concerning the Virtues of Tar Water (1744), §§249, 292, 293; —, De Motu (1721), §28; — Three Dialogues between Hylas and Philonous (1713), dial.III.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    P. Mansion, ‘Note sur le Caractère géométrique de l’ancienne Astronomie’, in: Abh. Gesch. Math. IX (1899);Google Scholar
  3. P. Duhem, ‘Essai sur la Notion de Théorie physique de Platon à Galilée’, in: Annales de Phil. Chrétienne, Paris 1908.Google Scholar
  4. 3.
    Ptolemy, Almagest, Bk.III, ch.4. In general, however, he is on the ‘mathematical’ side (Bk.XIII, ch.2).Google Scholar
  5. 4.
    Nicolaus Copernicus, De Revolutionibus Orbium Caelestium, Norimbergae 1543, Bk.V, ch.32, fol.l72r: ‘Prius autem quam recedamus à Mercurio, placuit alium adhuc modum recensere priore non minus credibilem, per quem accessus et recessus ille fieri ac intelligi possit’; fol.l73r: ‘… modum… non minus rationabilem priori…’Google Scholar
  6. 5.
    Ibidem, Praefatio Authoris, fol.IVr: ‘… ut experirem, an posito terrae aliquo motu firmiores demonstrationes, quam illorum essent, inveniri in revolutione orbium coelestium possent.’Google Scholar
  7. 6.
    Oslander to Rheticus, 20 April 1541. Cf Kepler, Apologia Tychonis contra Nicolaum Ursum (1601). Opera Omnia (ed. Frisch) Vol.I, Frankfurt-Erlangen 1858, p.246.Google Scholar
  8. 7.
    Oslander to Copernicus, 20 April 1541. Cf L. Prowe, Nicolaus Coppernicus, Vol.1.2, Berlin 1883, p.522: ‘De hypothesibus ego sic sensi semper, non esse articulos fidei, seu fundamenta calculi, ita ut, etiam si falsae sint, modo motuum phainomena exacte exhibeant, nihil referat…’Google Scholar
  9. 8.
    [A. Osiander], Ad Lectorem de Hypothesibus Huius Operis. In: Copernicus, De Revolutionibus fol.Ivs-Ilr.Google Scholar
  10. 9.
    [A. Osiander], Ad Lectorem de Hypothesibus Huius Operis. In: Copernicus, De Revolutionibus fol.Ivs-Ilr..Google Scholar
  11. 10.
    Kepler, Apologia Tychonis (Opera Omnia I, pp.238–248).Google Scholar
  12. 11.
    Kepler, Mysterium Cosmographicum, Tubingae 1596 Praefatio (Werke I, p.9).Google Scholar
  13. 12.
    Plato, Timaios, 30a.Google Scholar
  14. 13.
    Th. Paracelsus, Liber Meteororum (circa 1525), ch.2; Th. Paracelsus, Sämtliche Werke (ed. K. Sudhoff) Vol.XIII, München-Berlin 1931, p. 135: ‘so hat got drei für sich genomen und aus dreien alle ding gemacht… nun ist das wort auch dreifach gewesen, dan die trinitet hats gesprochen… und furhin seind alle ding in drei gesezt, und nichts ist auf erden, es hat und ist in drei speciebus.’Google Scholar
  15. 14.
    Kepler, Mysterium Cosmographicum, ch.2 (Werke I, p.27).Google Scholar
  16. 15.
    Kepler, Mysterium Cosmographicum, 2nd ed. Francofurti 1621. Notae in ch.2 (Werke VIII, 1963, p.63).Google Scholar
  17. 16.
    Kepler, Astronomia Nova (619), Pt.HI, ch.34 (Werke III, p.246).Google Scholar
  18. 17.
    Kepler, Apologia Tychonis (Opera I, p.246).Google Scholar
  19. 18.
    Kepler, Epitome Astronomiae Copernicanae, libri I-lII, Lentiis ad Danubium 1618, Bk.I. ‘ Adeoque hie est ipsissimus liber Naturae, in quo Deus conditor suam essentiam, suamque voluntatem erga hominem ex parte, et alogoi quodam scriptionis genere propalavit atque depinxit…’ (Werke VII, p.25). Cf Newton, Optice, sive de Reflexionibus, Refractionibus, Inflexionibus et Coloribus Lucis Libri Très. Londini 1706. (Latine reddidit Samuel Clarke), qu.23, pp.343, 345–346.Google Scholar
  20. 19.
    Kepler, ibidem, Vol.II, Lentiis 1620, Bk.IV (Werke. VII, p.254).Google Scholar
  21. 20.
    René Descartes, Discours de la Methode. Leyde 1637 (Oeuvres VI, pp.63–64). Descartes will be quoted from Oeuvres de Descartes, Ch. Adam and P. Tannery ed., XII vols. Paris 1899 — 1910.Google Scholar
  22. 21.
    Descartes, Principia Philosophiae, Amstelodami 1644, P.II, §36 (Oeuvres VIII, pp.61–62).Google Scholar
  23. 22.
    See R. Hooykaas, ‘Experientia ac Ratione’, Huygens tussen Descartes en Newton. Leiden 1979.Google Scholar
  24. 23.
    Descartes, Les Principes de la Philosophie, Paris 1647; Pars II,§52 (Oeuvres IX B, p. 193).Google Scholar
  25. 24.
    Descartes, Principia Philosophiae, P.II, §36 (Oeuvres VIII, p.329).Google Scholar
  26. 25.
    Descartes, La Dioptrique (1637) (Oeuvres VI, p.83).Google Scholar
  27. 26.
    Descartes, La Dioptrique (1637), p.83.Google Scholar
  28. 27.
    Descartes, La Dioptrique (1637), p.84.Google Scholar
  29. 28.
    Descartes, La Dioptrique (1637), p.98.Google Scholar
  30. 29.
    Descartes, La Dioptrique (1637), p.100.Google Scholar
  31. 30.
    Descartes, La Dioptrique (1637), p101.Google Scholar
  32. 31.
    Descartes, La Dioptrique (1637), p. 103.Google Scholar
  33. 32.
    Descartes, La Dioptrique (1637).Google Scholar
  34. 33.
    Descartes, La Dioptrique (1637).Google Scholar
  35. 34.
    Descartes, La Dioptrique (1637), p.84. On the difference between ‘motion’ and ‘action’ see Descartes’ letter to Morin, 13 July 1638 (Oeuvres II, p.215).Google Scholar
  36. 35.
    ‘Au reste, sçachant ainsi la cause des refractions qui se font dans l’eau et dans le verre…’ (Descartes, La Dioptrique; Oeuvres VI, p. 104).Google Scholar
  37. 36.
    Morin to Descartes, 22 February 1638 (Oeuvres I, pp.538–539); Descartes to Morin, 13 July 1638 (Oeuvres II, p. 198).Google Scholar
  38. 37.
    According to Chr. Huygens and Is. Vossius, Descartes must have known the sine law from a manuscript of Willebrord Snellius.Google Scholar
  39. 38.
    ‘Dixi nuper, cum una essemus, lumen in instanti… à corpore luminoso ad oculum pervenire… hoc mihi esse tarn certum, ut si falsitatis ergui posset, nil me prorsus scire in Philosophia confiteri paratus sim … Contra ego, si quae talis mora sensu perciperetur, totam meam Philosophiam funditus eversam fore inquiebam’ (Descartes to Beeckman, Amsterdam 22 August 1634; Oeuvres I, pp.307–308). Beeckman had proposed an experiment to test whether light needs time for transmission. If that experiment had been executed indeed, Descartes would have got his way, because the time lag between the emission of light and its return after reflexion by a mirror at half a mile distant would have been imperceptible. Yet Beeckman was right in principle as was shown later by Olaus Römer (1676).Google Scholar
  40. 39.
    Of course this should not be taken too seriously, for elsewhere he declared that if the senses taught something contrary to what he had demonstrated (by reasoning), then one should give more credit to his reasoning (see also page 235). Descartes had an unshakeable trust in his own reason (’God does not deceive us’).Google Scholar
  41. 40.
    Descartes, Principia Philosophiae, P.Ill, ‘De mundo adspectabili’ (On the visible world), §§19 (Oeuvres VIII, pp.26,28). ‘Terram in coelo suo quiescere, sed nihilominus ab eo deferri.’Google Scholar
  42. 41.
    Descartes, Principia Philosophiae, P.Ill, ‘De mundo adspectabili’ (On the visible world), §§19 (Oeuvres VIII, pp.26,28). ‘Terram in coelo suo quiescere, sed nihilominus ab eo deferri.’, §43 (Oeuvres VIII, p.99).Google Scholar
  43. 42.
    Descartes, Principia Philosophiae, P.Ill, ‘De mundo adspectabili’ (On the visible world), §§19 (Oeuvres VIII, pp.26,28). ‘Terram in coelo suo quiescere, sed nihilominus ab eo deferri.’, §44 (Oeuvres VIII, p.99).Google Scholar
  44. 43.
    Descartes, Principia Philosophiae, P.Ill, ‘De mundo adspectabili’ (On the visible world), §§19 (Oeuvres VIII, pp.26,28). ‘Terram in coelo suo quiescere, sed nihilominus ab eo deferri.’, §45 (Oeuvres VIII, pp.99–100).Google Scholar
  45. 44.
    Descartes, Principia Philosophiae, P.Ill, ‘De mundo adspectabili’ (On the visible world), §§19 (Oeuvres VIII, pp.26,28). ‘Terram in coelo suo quiescere, sed nihilominus ab eo deferri.’, §47 (Oeuvres VIII, p. 101).Google Scholar
  46. 45.
    Descartes, Principia Philosophiae, P.Ill, ‘De mundo adspectabili’ (On the visible world), §§19 (Oeuvres VIII, pp.26,28). ‘Terram in coelo suo quiescere, sed nihilominus ab eo deferri.’, Pt.IV, § 1 (Oeuvres VIII, p.203).Google Scholar
  47. 46.
    Descartes, Principia Philosophiae, P.Ill, ‘De mundo adspectabili’ (On the visible world), §§19 (Oeuvres VIII, pp.26,28). ‘Terram in coelo suo quiescere, sed nihilominus ab eo deferri.’, §§ 204–6 (Oeuvres VIII, pp.327–9).Google Scholar
  48. 47.
    Descartes, Principia Philosophiae, P.Ill, ‘De mundo adspectabili’ (On the visible world), §§19 (Oeuvres VIII, pp.26,28). ‘Terram in coelo suo quiescere, sed nihilominus ab eo deferri.’, Pt.III, §73 (Oeuvres VIII, p.99).Google Scholar
  49. 48.
    Mme C. Serrurier — who did not doubt the sincerity of Descartes’ religious faith — nevertheless concluded that ‘sa véritable religion a été le cartésianisme’. (C. Serrurier, ‘Descartes, l’Homme et le Croyant’, in: E.J. Dijksterhuis a.o. ed., Descartes et le Cartésianisme Hollandais. Paris-Amsterdam 1950, p.62.Google Scholar
  50. 49.
    ‘Larvatus prodeo’ (Descartes, Cogitationes Privatae, Oeuvres X, p.213).Google Scholar
  51. 50.
    ‘Nos nunquam falli, cur soles clari et distincti percepti assentimur’ (Descartes, Principia Philosophiae, Pt.I, §43; Oeuvres VIII, p.21).Google Scholar
  52. 51.
    Cf R. Hooykaas, ‘The First Kinetic Theory of Gases’, in: Arch. Intern. Hist. Sei. 2 (1948), pp.180–184. Also in: Actes Ve Congrès Intern. Hist. Sei., Lausanne, 30 Sept — 6 Oct 1947. Paris 1948, pp. 125–129; and in: R. Hooykaas, Selected Studies, pp.253–258.Google Scholar
  53. 52.
    Isaac Newton, Opticks: or, a Treatise on the Reflexions, Refractions, Inflexions and Colours of Light. London 1704. Bk.II, Pt.III, prop. 12, pp.78–86. Isaac Newton, Principia Mathematica, Bk.II, prop.23, theor.17, p.301. ‘Particulae viribus quae sunt reciproce proportionales distantiis centrorum suorum se mutuo fugientes componunt Fluidum Elasticum, cujus densitas est compressioni proportionalis. Et vice versa, si Fluidi ex particulis se mutuo fugientibus compositi densitas sit ut compressio, vires centrifugae particularum sunt reciproce proportionales distantiis centrorum.’Google Scholar
  54. 54.
    Isaac Newton, Optice, Quaestio 23, p.339.Google Scholar
  55. 55.
    Newton, Principia Mathematica, p.303: ‘Quod si particulae cujusque virtus in infinitum propagetur, opus erit vi majori ad aequalem condensationem majoris quantitatis Fluidi.’Google Scholar
  56. 56.
    Ibidem: ‘A vero Fluida Elastica ex particulis se mutuo fugantibus constent, Quaestio Physica est. Nos proprietatem Fluidorum ex ejusmodi particulis constantium Mathematice demonstravimus, ut Philosophis ansam praebeamus Quaestionem illam tractandi’.Google Scholar
  57. 57.
    ‘Die volle Wahrheit wird sich in dieser Weise nicht erreichen lassen … Die an sich einfachste Vorstellung … wird man … sogar als relativ, und, man darf sagen, als menschlich wahr bezeichnen müssen’ (A. Kékulé, Die wissenschaftlichen Ziele und Leistungen der Chemie. Bonn 1878, p.27).Google Scholar
  58. 58.
    Thomas Young, article ‘Chromatics’, Suppl. Encycl. Brit, written 1817. In: G. Peacocke and J. Leitch ed., Th. Young, Miscellaneous Works, Vol.1, London 1855, p.335.Google Scholar
  59. 59.
    Young to Arago, 12 January 1817 (Miscellaneous Works I, p.383).Google Scholar
  60. 60.
    Young (Miscellaneous Works I, p.234).Google Scholar
  61. 61.
    Ibidem, p383.Google Scholar
  62. 62.
    Ibidem, p.334.Google Scholar
  63. 63.
  64. 64.
    Fresnel recognized that ‘M. Young est le premier qui ait énoncé positivement la possibilité d’une telle propriété [viz. transverse vibrations] dans un fluide élastique.’ Young concluded from the optical properties of biaxial crystals discovered by D. Brewster, ‘que les ondulations de l’éther pourraient bien ressembler à celles d’une corde tendue d’une longueur indéfinie, et se propager de la même manière’ (A. Fresnel, ‘Sur le Calcul des Teintes que la Polarisation Développe dans les Lames Cristallisées’, in: Ann. Chimie et Phys. 17 (1821); Oeuvres I, pp.629 ff. We quote Fresnel from: Augustin Fresnel, Oeuvres complètes d’Augustin Fresnel, Emile Verdet a.o. ed., 3 vols, Paris 1866- 1870.Google Scholar
  65. 65.
    Fresnel (1822), Oeuvres II, Paris 1868, pp.4–5.Google Scholar
  66. 66.
    ‘M. Poisson nous a présenté le système de l’émission comme une espèce de Protée qui échappe aux objections en prenant toutes les formes, en adoptant toutes les hypothèses dont il a besoin. La multiplicité des hypothèses n’est pas une probabilité en faveur d’un système, et il peut d’ailleurs arriver, si on le multiplie trop, qu’elles deviennent difficiles à concilier entre elles, quand on les suit un peu avant dans leurs conséquences’ (Fresnel, ‘Sur les Accès de Facile Réflexion et de Facile Transmission des Molécules Lumineuses dans le Système d’émission’ (1821). From: Oeuvres II, p.155).Google Scholar
  67. 67.
    ‘Il est certaines lois si compliquées ou si singulières, que la seule observation aidée de l’analogie ne pourrait jamais les faire découvrir. Pour deviner ces énigmes, il faut être guidé par des idées théoriques appuyées sur une hypothèse vraie’ (A. Fresnel in 1823 (Oeuvres II, p.484); cf Oeuvres II, p.161 (1821)).Google Scholar
  68. 68.
    Fresnel in 1823 (Oeuvres II, p.485).Google Scholar
  69. 69.
    The motto of his publication on the diffraction of light (1818) is: ‘Natura simplex et fecunda’ (Fresnel, Oeuvres I, p.247): ‘Il est sans doute bien difficile de découvrir les bases de cette admirable économie, c’est-à-dire les causes les plus simples des phénomènes envisagés …’. But this ‘principe général de la philosophie des sciences physiques’ makes the human spirit adopt systems which ‘appuyés sur le plus petit nombre d’hypothèses, sont les plus féconds en conséquences’ (p.249). That is to say that methodological simplicity implies the greatest chance of hitting the ontological simplicity of nature: ‘Mais, dans le choix d’un système, on ne doit avoir égard qu’à la simplicité des hypothèses’ (p.248); ‘la nature paraît s’être proposé de faire beaucoup avec peu’ (p.249). ‘Les physiciens, qui ont étudié avec attention les lois de la nature sentiront que cette simplicité et ces relations intimes entre les diverses parties du phénomène offrent les plus grandes probabilités en faveur de la théorie qui les établit’ (Fresnel, ‘Second Mémoire sur la double Réfraction’ (1823). From: Oeuvres II, p.593).Google Scholar
  70. 70.
    ‘Wer etwas anderes als eine Welle mit dieser Eigenschaft sich denken kann, mag es seiner Ansicht anpassen’ (J. Fraunhofer, Gilb. Ann. 74 (1823), p.369).Google Scholar
  71. 71.
    R. J. Haüy, Traité de Minéralogie Vol.I, Paris 1801, pp.29ff; —, Traité de Cristallographie Voll, Paris 1823,pp.X,50.Google Scholar
  72. 72.
    R. J. Haüy, Essai d’une Théorie sur la Structure des Crystaux, Paris 1784, pp. 140–141.Google Scholar
  73. 73.
    Haüy, Traité de Minéralogie Voll, p.31.Google Scholar
  74. 74.
    Haüy, Traité de Minéralogie Vol.I, p.7; —, Traité élémentaire de Physique Vol.I, Paris 1803. p.71.Google Scholar
  75. 75.
    Haüy, Traité élémentaire de Physique Vol.I, p.72: ‘… s’ils ne nous donnent pas la figure des véritables molécules intégrantes des cristaux, méritent d’autant mieux de les remplacer dans nos conceptions.’Google Scholar
  76. 76.
    ‘Si ces formes … ne sont pas celles des vraies molécules intégrantes employées par la nature, elles méritent du moins d’autant mieux de les remplacer dans nos conceptions, que c’est avec une aussi petite dépense de moyens que nous parvenons à établir une théorie qui embrasse tant de résultats divers’ (Haüy, Traité de Minéralogie Vol.I, p.31). See also note 113 of chapter 6.Google Scholar
  77. 77.
    Haüy, Traité de Cristallographie Vol.I, p.50.Google Scholar
  78. 78.
    Haüy, Traité élémentaire de Physique Vol.I, p.70; —, Traité de Cristallographie Vol.I, p.IX: ‘On reconnaît ici ce qui caractérise en général les lois émanées de la puissance et de la sagesse de Dieu qui l’a créée et la dirige. Economie et simplicité dans les moyens, richesse et fécondité inépuisables dans les résultats.’Google Scholar
  79. 79.
    R.J. Haüy, ‘Sur la Manière de ramener à la Théorie des Parallélépipèdes, celle de toutes les autres Formes primitives des Cristaux’, in: Mém. Acad. d. Sei. pour 1789, Paris 1793, pp.519–533.Google Scholar
  80. 80.
    Haüy, Traité élémentaire de Physique Vol.I, p.89; cf Traité de Minéralogie Vol.I, p.98.Google Scholar
  81. 81.
    Haüy, Traité de Minéralogie Vol.I, p.98; —, Traité de Cristallographie Vol.I, p.52.Google Scholar
  82. 82.
    H.J. Brooke, A Familiar Introduction to Crystallography. London 1823, p.52.Google Scholar
  83. 83.
    G. Delafosse, Recherches sur la Cristallisation, considérée sous les Rapports physiques et mathématiques. Paris 1843 (Extrait des Mém. Acad. Sei. Paris 8 (1843), pp.641–692).Google Scholar
  84. 84.
    A. Bravais, Mémoire sur les Systèmes formés par des Points distribués régulièrement sur un Plan ou dans l’Espace (présenté à l’Académie des Sciences le 11 déc.1848), pp.2–3: ‘On peut, sans inconvénient et pour fixer les idées, attribuer à ces sommets des dimensions très-petites, en faire de véritables molécules, et attacher spécialement le nom de sommet aux centres de figure de ces molécules dont la forme polyhédrale restera d’ailleurs indéterminée.’Google Scholar
  85. 85.
    Cf ‘Report on the Development of the Geometrical Theories of Crystal Structure 1666 — 1901’, in: Reports Brit. Assoc. Adv. Science 1901, pp.297–337.Google Scholar
  86. 86.
    ‘La notation des formules est quelque chose de purement conventionnel, comme le sont les équivalents chimiques eux-mêmes; mais telle qu’elle a été généralement adoptée, elle offre l’inconvénient d’habituer l’esprit à y voir des choses absolues, tandis qu’elle ne devrait exprimer que de simples rapports’ (Ch. Gerhardt, Précis de Chimie organique Vol.I, Paris 1844. Avant- propos, p.IX).Google Scholar
  87. 87.
    ‘C’est un préjugé si généralement répandu qu’on peut, par les formules chimiques, exprimer la constitution moléculaire des corps, c’est-à-dire le véritable arrangement de leurs atomes, que j’aurai peut-être de la peine à persuader du contraire quelques-uns de mes lecteurs …’ (Ch. Gerhardt, Traité de Chimie organique Vol.YV, Paris 1856, §2450, ‘Sens des formules’, p.561)Google Scholar
  88. 88.
    ‘C’est un préjugé si généralement répandu qu’on peut, par les formules chimiques, exprimer la constitution moléculaire des corps, c’est-à-dire le véritable arrangement de leurs atomes, que j’aurai peut-être de la peine à persuader du contraire quelques-uns de mes lecteurs …’ (Ch. Gerhardt, Traité de Chimie organique Vol.YV, Paris 1856, §2450, ‘Sens des formules’, p.56l.Google Scholar
  89. 89.
    ‘C’est un préjugé si généralement répandu qu’on peut, par les formules chimiques, exprimer la constitution moléculaire des corps, c’est-à-dire le véritable arrangement de leurs atomes, que j’aurai peut-être de la peine à persuader du contraire quelques-uns de mes lecteurs …’ (Ch. Gerhardt, Traité de Chimie organique Vol.YV, Paris 1856, §2450, ‘Sens des formules’, p.563Google Scholar
  90. 90.
    ‘Une notation est d’autant meilleure qu’elle rappelle à l’esprit plus d’analogies, qu’elle lui suggère plus de pensées fécondes’ (Traité de Chimie organique Vol.YV, p.564).Google Scholar
  91. 91.
    ‘Les formules chimiques … ne sont pas destinées à représenter l’arrangement des atomes; mais elles ont pour but de rendre évidentes, de la manière la plus simple et la plus exacte, les relations qui rattachent les corps entre eux sous le rapport des transformations’ (Traité de Chimie organique Vol.YV, p.566).Google Scholar
  92. 92.
    Gerhardt (and Williamson before him) had abandoned the simple and static idea that an initial structure immediately turns into a different final structure: ‘Nous ne savons pas ce qui se passe en réalité dans l’intérieur de la molécule d’un corps lorsqu’il se transforme.’ He recognized that many intermediate stages may occur of which the chemist has no idea at all and that, consequently, the behaviour of the molecule cannot be wholly predicted from the image we make of it. He was aware of the fact that chemistry deals with interactions. What is called a double decomposition is ‘simply an image’, an interpretation of similar relations. He denied that a ‘rational formula’ of a body, once given, ‘is immovable — or in other words — that each body has only one rational formula’ (Traité de Chimie organique Vol.YV, p.576).Google Scholar
  93. 93.
    Ibidem, p.586;cf pp.561–566.Google Scholar
  94. 94.
    ‘… mes types signifient tout autre chose que les types de M. Dumas, ceux-ci se rapportant à l’arrangement supposé des atomes dans les corps, arrangement qui, dans mon opinion, est inaccessible à l’expérience (ibidem, p.586).Google Scholar
  95. 95.
    ‘Dieselben [viz. die Gerhardtschen Typen] sind der Entwicklung der Wissenschaft ausserordentlich förderlich gewesen. Sie konnten aber nur als Theile eines Gerüstes betrachtet werden, das man abbrach, nachdem der Aufbau des Systèmes der organischen Chemie weit genug gediehen war, um seiner entbehren zu können’ (Lothar Meyer, Die modernen Theorien der Chemie. 5e Aufl. Breslau 1884,p.220).Google Scholar
  96. 96.
    Gerhardt, Traité de Chimie organique Vol.IV, p.563.Google Scholar
  97. 97.
    Meyer, Traité de Chimie organique Vol.IV, p. 198. Once alcohol is conceived as the use of various ‘rational’ formulae for this same substance (C2H5OH and C2H4-H20) has become obsolete.Google Scholar
  98. 98.
    G.W. Wheland, The Theory of Resonance and its Application to Organic Chemistry. NewYork- London 1944. p.5.Google Scholar
  99. 99.
    L. Pauling, The Nature of the Chemical Bond and the Structure of Molecules and Crystals. Ithaca- NewYork 1960, p.217. The objection that the two benzenes are equivalent is answered by Wheland, The Theory of Resonance, p.4.Google Scholar
  100. 100.
    Wheland, The Theory of Resonance, p.3.Google Scholar
  101. 101.
    Wheland, The Theory of Resonance, ed.l955,p.4.Google Scholar
  102. 102.
    Wheland, The Theory of Resonance, p.5.Google Scholar
  103. 103.
    W. Hückel, Theoretische Grundlagen der organischen Chemie, 2. ed. Voll, Leipzig 1934, p.439: ‘Erschöpfung der formalen Ausdrucksmittel.’Google Scholar
  104. 104.
    Ibidem, p.137.Google Scholar
  105. 105.
    L. Pauling, The Nature of the Chemical Bond, 2nd ed. 1945Google Scholar
  106. Quoted by I.M. Hunsberger, ’Theoretical Chemistry in Russia’, in: J. Chem. Educ. 31 (1954), p.509.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  107. 106.
    çf Hunsberger, ibidem, note 13.Google Scholar
  108. 107.
    Wheland, The Theory of Resonance ed. 1944, p.28.Google Scholar
  109. 108.
    We borrow our data from the reports in Questions scientifiques III, Chimie, published by ‘Les éditions de la Nouvelle Critique’, Paris 1953. The French editors were, as their introduction to these reports unambiguously declares, faithful Stalinists. Cf pp.7–9: ‘Car s’il est évident que ia lutte des opinions’, selon l’expression de Staline, est indispensable entre savants de tous les pays … qui oserait dire, après avoir lu le présent travail, qu’une telle liberté n’existe pas en Union Soviétique?’ A commission of the Academy made a preliminary report on the theory of resonance, criticizing its Russian adherents. Kedrov had a large share in the discussion about that report. His ’intervention’ and the more elaborate article in which he repeated it (B.M. Kedrov, ‘Contre l’idéalisme et le mécanisme en chimie organique’, in: Questions scientifiques III, pp.47ff) are the main sources for my quotations. See especially pp.32, 51, 52, 54, 55.Google Scholar
  110. 109.
    See: Hunsberger, ‘Theoretical Chemistry in Russia’, pp.510–511. (This paper had been seen by Pauling). See also J.K. Syrkine, ‘Critique de mes erreurs’, in: Questions scientifiques III, pp.73ff.Google Scholar
  111. 110.
    See L.R. Graham, ‘A Soviet Marxist View of Structural Chemistry: The Theory of Resonance Controversy’, in: Isis 55 (1964), p.24 n.20.Google Scholar
  112. 111.
    Mendeleev, however, unnecessarily connected the notion of ‘element’ with that of ‘atom’. Cf R. Hooykaas, ‘De Wet van Elementenbehoud’, in: Chemisch Weekblad 43 (1947), p.527 (Engl, transi. ‘The Law of Conservation of Elements’, in: R. Hooykaas, Selected Studies pp. 121–143.)Google Scholar
  113. 112.
    G. Urbain, Les Notions fondamentales d’Elément chimique et d’Atome. Paris 1925, p.9. The ’element’ oxygen (O) is ‘une idée pure, et défie toute description positive’.Google Scholar
  114. 113.
    Kedrov, ‘Contre l’Idéalisme’, pp.70–71. Questions scientifiques III, pp.34–36.Google Scholar
  115. 115.
    Kedrov, ‘Contre l’Idéalisme’, pp.70–71. Questions scientifiques III, p.35. Google Scholar
  116. 116.
    Kedrov, ‘Contre l’Idéalisme’, p.61. Kedrov was of the opinion that the defenders of resonance had made only a first step on the way towards recognizing their errors (p.57) and that the report was too much of a compromise, whereas organic chemistry should be ‘liberated from this reactionary burden’, by developing the theory of Butlerov and thus opening ‘the way to its free development’, out of the ‘blind alley of the most inveterate mysticism and scholasticism’ (pp.62–63).Google Scholar
  117. 117.
    J.C.Maxwell, ‘On Faraday’s Lines of Force’ (1855 — 1856). From: Scientific Papers I, London 1890, p. 156.Google Scholar
  118. 118.
    J.C.Maxwell, ‘On Faraday’s Lines of Force’ (1855 — 1856). From: Scientific Papers I, London 1890, p.\59. Google Scholar
  119. 119.
    Pierre Duhem, La Théorie physique, son Objet, sa Structure. 2nd ed. Paris, p.30.Google Scholar
  120. 120.
    Pierre Duhem, La Théorie physique, son Objet, sa Structure, pp.31–32.Google Scholar
  121. 121.
    Pierre Duhem, La Théorie physique, son Objet, sa Structure, p.34.Google Scholar
  122. 122.
    Pierre Duhem, La Théorie physique, son Objet, sa Structure, p.36.Google Scholar
  123. 123.
    Henri Poincaré, La Science et l’Hypothèse. Paris 1902, ch X.Google Scholar
  124. 124.
    Ibidem, pp. 190–1.Google Scholar
  125. 125.
    Sir James Jeans, Tlie Mysterious Universe. Cambridge 1930, p. 142: The laws of nature … the laws of thought of a universal mind’. The uniformity of nature proclaims the self-consistency of this mind’(p. 140).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Hooykaas
    • 1
  1. 1.UtrechtThe Netherlands

Personalised recommendations