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Thinking with the Hands

  • R. Hooykaas
Chapter
  • 192 Downloads
Part of the Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science book series (BSPS, volume 205)

Abstract

An ‘Experiment’ is a deliberate act which aims at knowledge of nature and power over nature. In medieval Latin, however, ‘experimentatum est’ can also refer to a mere rather passive observation; in modern French ‘expérience’ is a word for experience in general as well as for experimentation.

Keywords

Thought Experiment Incline Plane Calcium Carbonate Precipitate Mechanical Equivalent Phlogiston Theory 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Hooykaas
    • 1
  1. 1.UtrechtThe Netherlands

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