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Expert Tsunami Database for the Pacific: Motivation, Design, and Proof-of-Concept Demonstration

  • V. K. Gusiakov
  • An. G. Marchuk
  • A. V. Osipova
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Natural and Technological Hazards Research book series (NTHR, volume 9)

Abstract

As a result of a feasibility study, a concept and a prototype of the Expert Tsunami Database (ETDB) was developed at the Tsunami Research Group of the Novosibirsk Computing Center, Russian Academy of Sciences. The concept of the system is based on the integration of numerical models with observational, historical and geological data, and processing and analysis tools. These components are integrated with the visualization and mapping software embedded in a specifically developed graphic shell providing fast and efficient manipulation of maps, models and data. The ETDB is intended to be a comprehensive source of observational data on historical tsunamis and seismicity in a particular region, along with some basic additional and reference information related to the tsunami problem. The primary collection of data and their long-term storage are made within the Data Base Management System dBASE IV; however, the further retrieval, dissemination, and processing of data are made on the basis of a specially developed graphic shell that is an enhanced environment for IBM PCs and compatibles for data handling and manipulation and can be used independently from the mother’s database. In its current form, the ETDB contains the condensed source data on more than 800 tsunamigenic events occurring in the Pacific between 684 to 1995 and detailed data (extended source parameters, observed heights, original historical descriptions, etc.) for 129 Kuril-Kamchatka events which occurred within the region since 1737 along with basic reference information on regional seismic and mareograph networks, regional geography, geology and tectonics. Additionally, it includes some blocks for tsunami modeling (e.g. calculation of static bottom displacement, tsunami travel time charts) and some standardized built-in tools for data processing and plotting..

Keywords

Tsunamigenic Earthquake Historical Tsunami Tsunami Data Tsunami Intensity Graphic Shell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. K. Gusiakov
    • 1
  • An. G. Marchuk
    • 1
  • A. V. Osipova
    • 1
  1. 1.Computing CenterNovosibirskRussia

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