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The New York State Do-Not-Resuscitate Law: A Study of Public Policy-Making

  • Martin A. Strosberg
Part of the Philosophy and Medicine book series (PHME, volume 48)

Abstract

Policy analysts frequently describe the public policy-making process as a sequential pattern of activity. In this essay, we examine the history of the New York State Do-Not-Resuscitate (DNR) Law by applying a commonly-used four-stage template [39]:
  1. 1.

    Agenda-setting: Individuals and groups bringing an issue to public attention and formal consideration by public officials. (Example: The Task Force Report).

     
  2. 2.

    Policy formulation and adoption: Identifying, debating, and choosing among major policy alternatives, followed by the legitimization of one alternative as a collectively determined purposive course of action. (Example: Article 29-B, New York Public Health Law).

     
  3. 3.

    Policy implementation: Undertaking purposeful, organized activity to transform a policy into a program whose outputs correspond to the intended objectives. (Example: various New York State Department of Health Memoranda on the subject Do-Not-Resuscitate Orders).

     
  4. 4.

    Policy evaluation: Monitoring and review of programs and their incremental modification, reorientation, or termination. (Example: 1991 Amendments to the New York State Public Health Law).

     

Keywords

York State Department Task Force Report Procedural Requirement Presume Consent Medical Futility 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Martin A. Strosberg

There are no affiliations available

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