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Very Thick Walled Cylindrical Shells

  • Jack R. Vinson
Part of the Solid Mechanics and Its Applications book series (SMIA, volume 18)

Abstract

As performance requirements increase for pressure vessels and deep submergence vehicles, as the need increases for higher pressure test facilities, and because arteries and veins have the geometry they do, there is an increased need for a shell theory for very thick shells; say, a wall thickness to mean shell radius ratio (h/R) of 0.5. Such a theory is presented here. In addition, explicit solutions are provided in order to analyze a finite length circular cylindrical shell under both axially symmetric lateral distributed loading and in-plane loads, composed of an isotropic material.

Keywords

Cylindrical Shell Radial Stress Legendre Polynomial Lateral Load Circumferential Stress 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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    Waltz, T. L. and J. R. Vinson, “Analysis of Very Thick Walled Composite Cylindrical Shells Subjected to Axially Symmetric Loads”, Transactions of the Fifth Japan-U.S. Conference on Composite Materials, Tokyo, June 1990.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jack R. Vinson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Mechanical Engineering and the Center for Composite MaterialsUniversity of DelawareNewarkUSA

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