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Transport processes in wood

  • T. A. G. Langrish
  • J. C. F. Walker

Abstract

The movement of fluids through wood is complicated by the fact that the coarse capillary system is interconnected via smaller openings. The favoured path for the movement of fluids through wood varies according to the fluid, the nature of the driving force (e.g. pressure, moisture gradient) as well as being sensitive to variations in wood structure. Possible flow paths are shown in Fig. 5.1.

Keywords

Resin Canal Fibre Saturation Point Average Moisture Content Tracheid Length Capillary Tension 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© J.C.F. Walker 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. A. G. Langrish
  • J. C. F. Walker

There are no affiliations available

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