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Basic wood chemistry and cell wall ultrastructure

  • J. C. F. Walker

Abstract

All woods are composed of cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin. Cellulose and hemicelluloses are polysaccharides while lignin is an oxygenated polymer of phenylpropane units. In addition there is a variable quantity of extraneous chemicals known collectively as extractives and small amounts of inorganic elements such as calcium, magnesium and potassium. The inorganic ash content is usually 0.1–0.3% by weight and rarely exceeds 0.5%, except in some tropical hardwoods where a high silica content (a few percent) can cause rapid wear and blunting of machine tools. In this chapter the structural components of wood -cellulose, the hemicelluloses and lignin — will be examined in turn while some features of extractives will be discussed briefly.

Keywords

Ellagic Acid Secondary Wall Cellulose Microfibril Cellulose Chain Resin Acid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© J.C.F. Walker 1993

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  • J. C. F. Walker

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