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Building Epidemiology — Approaches and Results (European Experience)

  • C. A. C. Pickering
Part of the Eurocourses: Chemical and Environmental Science book series (EUCE, volume 4)

Abstract

There have been three systematic studies in Europe, using randomly selected buildings and relating multiple office building characteristics to the symptoms of sick building syndrome. The studies have varied in design and to a certain extent in conclusions. All have shown an excess of symptoms in sealed, airconditioned buildings when compared to naturally ventilated buildings.

Keywords

Sick Building Syndrome Indoor Climate Sick Building Syndrome Ventilation Group Visual Display Terminal 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. A. C. Pickering
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, North West Lung CentreWythenshawe HospitalManchesterUK

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