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Fluid—rock interaction in the north-west Adirondack Mountains, New York State

  • Ian Cartwright
  • John W. Valley
Chapter
Part of the The Mineralogical Society Series book series (MIBS, volume 2)

Abstract

One of the principal tasks in metamorphic petrology is to discern the timing and extent of fluid-rock interaction during metamorphism. Fluids, if present in large volumes, will control a variety of metamorphic and metasomatic processes, including: the transport of chemical components and heat; the promotion or prevention of anatexis; and the genesis of economic deposits. The presence of fluids will also affect the rheology of the crust and its geophysical properties. Fluid-rich zones have been invoked as the cause of seismic reflections in the lower crust (e.g. Brown et al. 1983, Matthews 1986, Mooney & Brocher 1987) and regions of enhanced electrical conductivity (Shankland & Ander 1983).

Keywords

Shear Zone Fluid Inclusion Oxygen Isotope Regional Metamorphism Fluid Infiltration 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© J.R. Ashworth, M. Brown & contributors 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ian Cartwright
  • John W. Valley

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