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Prograde metamorphism, anatexis, and retrogression of the Scourian Complex, north-west Scotland

  • Ian Cartwright
Chapter
Part of the The Mineralogical Society Series book series (MIBS, volume 2)

Abstract

The Lewisian of north-west Scotland is an eastern extension of the North Atlantic Craton and is probably the most intensively studied Precambrian gneiss terrain in the world. Recent reviews of mainland Lewisian geology include summaries of gneiss geochemistry (Tarney & Weaver 1987), metamor-phic conditions and causes of metamorphism (Sills & Rollinson 1987; Barnicoat 1987; Cartwright & Barnicoat 1987, 1989; Barnicoat et al. 1987), structural evolution (Jensen 1984, Coward & Park 1987, Park et al. 1987), and geophysical properties (Hall 1987). The mainland Lewisian may be subdivided into two regions (Fig. 13.1). The central Scourian Complex largely preserves metamorphic mineralogies and tectonic fabrics of Archaean age; the adjacent Laxfordian areas underwent extensive Proterozoic reworking. This contribution discusses the metamorphic evolution of the Scourian Complex, which is summarized in Table 13.1.

Keywords

Partial Melting Geological Society Granulite Facies PROGRADE Metamorphism Crustal Anatexis 
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© J.R. Ashworth, M. Brown & contributors 1990

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  • Ian Cartwright

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