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Multipurpose Uses and Basin-Wide Development

  • Ludwik A. Teclaff

Abstract

Except in the so-called fluvial civilizations, where the same waterworks served the purposes of irrigation, flood control, and navigation,1 there was little correlated development of water resources throughout history until recent times. Each use was developed separately without regard to possible conflict with other uses. By the end of the nineteenth century, however, it had become evident to men of vision that for fullest utilization the waters of a stream or of an entire basin should be made to perform as many tasks as possible. Greatly increased demand for water made this desirable. Technology made it feasible2.

Keywords

River Basin Supra Note Water Resource Development Columbia River Basin Basin Authority 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff, The Hague, Netherlands 1967

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ludwik A. Teclaff
    • 1
  1. 1.Fordham University School of LawUSA

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