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Freezing of Dairy Products

  • Byron H. Webb
  • Wendell S. Arbuckle
Chapter

Abstract

Dairy products other than ice cream and other frozen desserts require only simple preparation for freezing. Ice cream, ice milk, and sherbets, discussed later, are complicated mixtures of ingredients and the freezing process plays a very special part in their manufacture. Ice cream is eaten in a frozen state, but other dairy products are frozen only to preserve them for future use. They are thawed before consumption. Freezing of dairy products is a process for maintaining them in a fresh state during necessary periods of storage.

Keywords

Dairy Product Freezing Point Storage Life Cottage Cheese Milk Solid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Additional Reading

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Copyright information

© The AVI Publishing Company, Inc. 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • Byron H. Webb
  • Wendell S. Arbuckle

There are no affiliations available

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