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The chemotherapy of gonorrhoea and nonspecific genital infections

  • G. L. Ridgway
Chapter
Part of the Current Status of Modern Therapy book series (CSMT, volume 4)

Abstract

The spectrum of sexually transmitted diseases has changed in recent years1. No longer is the physician dealing with two diseases (gonorrhoea and syphilis) treatable with a single antibiotic (penicillin). Chlamydiae, mycoplasmas, other bacteria (Donovan’s bacillus, Haemophilus ducreyii, anaerobes), viruses, protozoa, fungi and arthropods may all be encountered, often not alone in any individual patient. Willcox2 3has ably reviewed the attitude of the pharmaceutical industry to this range of organisms, drawing attention to a number of deficiencies, both in the provision of established antibiotics (e.g. depot penicillin preparations), and failure to achieve satisfactory chemotherapy for some diseases (Herpes genitalis).

Keywords

Chlamydia Trachomatis Mycoplasma Hominis Procaine Penicillin Single Dose Therapy Gonococcal Urethritis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© MTP Press Limited 1980

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  • G. L. Ridgway

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