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Clinical Assessment of the Obese Individual

  • Cecilia Pemberton
Part of the Sports Medicine and Health Science book series (SMHS)

Abstract

The word “obesity” is derived from the Latin ob, meaning over, and edere, meaning to eat. The longstanding bias that obesity is simply the result of overeating is reflected in the derivation of the word. In fact, the idea that obesity is the result of ingestion of more calories than expended has become a socially accepted, and often medically reinforced truism. However, the energy equation should be viewed as simply a statement of the conditions required for deposition of lipids in adipocytes and not the cause of the caloric imbalance. Focus on energy balance, without consideration of the underlying causes, is a deterrant to selection of potentially effective treatment options and perpetuates an often inappropriate attitude of blame toward the obese individual.

Keywords

Metabolic Rate Caloric Restriction Obese Individual Addictive Behavior Psychiatric Disturbance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Spectrum Publications, Inc. 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cecilia Pemberton

There are no affiliations available

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