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Experimental Studies on the Prevention of Rh Haemolytic Disease

  • R. Finn
  • C. A. Clarke
  • W. T. A. Donohoe
  • R. B. McConnell
  • P. M. Sheppard
  • D. Lehane
  • W. Kulke

Abstract

In the context of haemolytic disease of the newborn, ABO incompatibility means that the father’s blood is unsuitable for transfusion into the mother, and our interest in this stems from the work of Levine (1943), who noted a deficiency of such mating types in the parents of affected children. He deduced, therefore, that ABO incompatibility affords a degree of protection against Rh haemolytic disease, and this has been confirmed by many workers. Of particular interest are the experiments of Stern et al. (1956), who showed that male volunteers could be much more easily sensitized to Rh if the injected blood were ABO compatible.

Keywords

Foetal Cell Foetal Blood Maternal Circulation Placental Barrier Haemolytic Disease 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Lancet Ltd 1961

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Finn
    • 1
  • C. A. Clarke
    • 1
  • W. T. A. Donohoe
    • 1
  • R. B. McConnell
    • 1
  • P. M. Sheppard
    • 2
  • D. Lehane
    • 3
  • W. Kulke
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of MedicineUniversity of LiverpoolUK
  2. 2.Sub-Department of GeneticsUniversity of LiverpoolUK
  3. 3.Liverpool Regional Blood Transfusion ServiceUK
  4. 4.Radio-isotope UnitLiverpool Radium InstituteUK

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