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Abstract

The large size of the Royal College of General Practitioners’ Oral Contraception Study enables the risk to users to be estimated with increased precision. It is now clear that non-smokers may safely use oral contraceptives beyond the age of 40 years, especially if brands with low-progestogen activity are prescribed. There is no longer convincing evidence that duration of use contributes materially to the risk. However, for cigarette smokers it would normally be unwise to continue use after the age of 35 years, unless they stop smoking.

Keywords

General Practitioner Arterial Disease Royal College Benign Breast Disease Fertility Control 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© MTP Press Limited 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. R. Kay

There are no affiliations available

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