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Rare—common differences: an overview

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Part of the Population and Community Biology Series book series (PCBS,volume 17)

Abstract

Comparative studies of the biological traits of taxonomically related rare and common species are scarce. The past couple of decades, however, have seen a growing number of attempts to rectify this situation. In the main (though not exclusively), these studies have concerned small numbers of species, in one or a few genera, and have examined at most a few features of their biologies. Nonetheless, some potentially important regularities have begun to emerge. In this chapter we will consider several of these patterns and review the evidence for them. Discussion of possible mechanisms and related theory is left to later chapters in the book (many of the studies cited here will thus make later reappearances).

Keywords

  • Body Size
  • Rare Species
  • Geographical Range
  • Competitive Ability
  • Resource Usage

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© 1997 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht

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Gaston, K.J., Kunin, W.E. (1997). Rare—common differences: an overview. In: Kunin, W.E., Gaston, K.J. (eds) The Biology of Rarity. Population and Community Biology Series, vol 17. Springer, Dordrecht. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-011-5874-9_2

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-011-5874-9_2

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