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Solution-spinning processes

Chapter

Abstract

If a polymer can be melted under reasonable conditions, its conversion to a fibre by melt-spinning is preferred over the solution-spinning process, mainly as the former does not involve the use of solvents and the problems associated with their use, namely their removal, recovery, the associated environmental concerns and the low spinning speeds. When melt-spinning cannot be carried out, either because the polymer degrades before melting or the melt is thermally unstable, distinction as to the type of process is made depending upon whether the solvent is removed by evaporation by heating (dry-spinning) or by coagulation in another fluid which is compatible with the spinning solvent, but is itself not a solvent for the polymer (wet-spinning). Historically, the formation of fibres by dry-spinning was the first to evolve as a method for manufacturing polymer-based fibres, as pointed out in Chapter 3. In the present chapter, the solution-spinning processes will be briefly described.

Keywords

Coagulation Bath Coagulation Rate Cellulose Triacetate Hydraulic Drag Bicomponent Fibre 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1997

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