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Effects of mechanical ventilation on kidney function

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Abstract

Mechanical ventilation affects the regulation of body fluids by influencing renal function. Increases in intrathoracic pressure commonly decreases urine volume and sodium excretion. This is associated with a positive water and sodium balance which is an undesired side effect of mechanical ventilation. In this chapter, the pathophysiology of mechanical ventilation and its effects on intrathoracic pressure are shown. New strategies of ventilatory support are briefly presented and finally the consequences of ventilatory therapy for renal function are discussed.

Keywords

  • Continuous Positive Airway Pressure
  • Airway Pressure
  • Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Patient
  • Spontaneous Breathing
  • Intrathoracic Pressure

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Burchardi, H. (1998). Effects of mechanical ventilation on kidney function. In: Critical Care Nephrology. Springer, Dordrecht. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-011-5482-6_89

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-011-5482-6_89

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