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Effect of irrigation with secondary sewage effluent on the transport of soil-borne pesticides

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Modern Agriculture and the Environment

Part of the book series: Developments in Plant and Soil Sciences ((DPSS,volume 71))

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Abstract

Efforts to minimize pollution and alleviate chronic water shortages in many parts of the world have resulted in the increased use of treated sewage effluent in irrigated agriculture. One of the problems associated with this practice is the potential for enhanced transport of agrochemicals such as pesticides as a result of complexation with relatively mobile effluent-borne macromolecules and colloids. Interaction of macromolecules and colloids with soil organic carbon may also change the nature of soil sorption sites and reduce the surface area available for pesticide sorption. Enhanced transport of nearly water insoluble pesticides at dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations as low as 5 mg L-1 has been demonstrated in laboratory studies (Dunnivant et al., 1992a). The use of effluents in irrigated agriculture with relatively higher levels of organic carbon (15–150 mg DOC L-1) therefore may result in deep soil and groundwater contamination by pesticides due to enhanced downward transport.

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© 1997 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht

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Graber, E.R. (1997). Effect of irrigation with secondary sewage effluent on the transport of soil-borne pesticides. In: Rosen, D., Tel-Or, E., Hadar, Y., Chen, Y. (eds) Modern Agriculture and the Environment. Developments in Plant and Soil Sciences, vol 71. Springer, Dordrecht. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-011-5418-5_25

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-011-5418-5_25

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Dordrecht

  • Print ISBN: 978-94-010-6279-4

  • Online ISBN: 978-94-011-5418-5

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